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Topic : Where Should Your Child Sleep?

Number of Replies: 261
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Created on : Thursday, June 30, 2005, 12:59:51 pm
Author : dataimport
Does your child sleep in a crib, his own bed, or with you? Tell us what works for your family.

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January 9, 2006, 5:42 pm CST

Where Should Your Child Sleep?

Quote From: my_2angels

A 7 week old baby is NOT ready for cereal, in any way. Don't feed your baby solid foods until at least 4 months.
solid foods and cereal are two different things.  and anyway i started my son on baby food at 2 months and he had a small amount of cereal in his bottle at 3 weeks. 
 
January 9, 2006, 6:28 pm CST

Well I'll stick to a doctors advice.

Quote From: kendellsma

yes they will tell u that but that does not mean that it is not a good idea.  and every child that i have seen that has been given cereal doesnt overeat and does sleep longer.  it all depends on what the mom want to do.
I'd rather suffer through a few months of little sleep then risk confusing my child's hunger/full reflex. But you're right. It does depend on the mother. Some women are willing to risk overfeeding for a couple hours more sleep, others aren't. And every child that I have seen that has been given cereal before the age of 4 months does overeat and it didn't adjust their sleeping a bit, so... *Shrug*
 
January 9, 2006, 6:28 pm CST

Where Should Your Child Sleep?

Quote From: kendellsma

solid foods and cereal are two different things.  and anyway i started my son on baby food at 2 months and he had a small amount of cereal in his bottle at 3 weeks. 
Cereal IS solid food. And a 7 week old baby should not have either.
 
January 9, 2006, 7:36 pm CST

Where Should Your Child Sleep?

Quote From: my_2angels

I'd rather suffer through a few months of little sleep then risk confusing my child's hunger/full reflex. But you're right. It does depend on the mother. Some women are willing to risk overfeeding for a couple hours more sleep, others aren't. And every child that I have seen that has been given cereal before the age of 4 months does overeat and it didn't adjust their sleeping a bit, so... *Shrug*
its not overfeeding ur child.. since i did it , if i was overfeeding my child and :messed up his hunger/full reflex" then my child should be over the average weight for his age and he isnt.  it doesnt mean that u are a bad mom or that u dont know what ur doing..... every mother has to figure out what is right for them and their child
 
January 9, 2006, 9:25 pm CST

JUST TO ADD...

Quote From: my_2angels

Cereal IS solid food. And a 7 week old baby should not have either.

That babies shouldn't have any solids until they are over 4 months old as their tummies and other organs just aren't ready for food/solids and if you feed them food/solids too soon then you could risk doing damage to their kidneys and livers.(This information I found out from a Doctor as well as reading some books on feeding babies solids). 

 

One other thing, I wasn't able to breastfed my daughter when she was born, so I had to bottlefed her with formula and she did fine with formula. So, I was going to say that I don't know that much about breastmilk, but if a baby is having to be breastfed every hour or 2 then might it be the case that the baby isn't get enough from the breastmilk and may have to go onto formula, as formula is more filling than breastmilk and the baby shouldn't need to be fed as often. Which could be a good thing in a way, especially if you as the Mother would like your baby to sleep just that little bit longer, just my thoughts on this. 

 

Please TAKE CARE, LOVE KELLY. 

 
January 10, 2006, 11:55 am CST

Thank you for the info!

Quote From: ceders2

That babies shouldn't have any solids until they are over 4 months old as their tummies and other organs just aren't ready for food/solids and if you feed them food/solids too soon then you could risk doing damage to their kidneys and livers.(This information I found out from a Doctor as well as reading some books on feeding babies solids). 

 

One other thing, I wasn't able to breastfed my daughter when she was born, so I had to bottlefed her with formula and she did fine with formula. So, I was going to say that I don't know that much about breastmilk, but if a baby is having to be breastfed every hour or 2 then might it be the case that the baby isn't get enough from the breastmilk and may have to go onto formula, as formula is more filling than breastmilk and the baby shouldn't need to be fed as often. Which could be a good thing in a way, especially if you as the Mother would like your baby to sleep just that little bit longer, just my thoughts on this. 

 

Please TAKE CARE, LOVE KELLY. 

Most breastfed babies eat more often the bottlefed babies. Breastfeeding mothers are advised that unless the child isn't having enough wet/dirty diapers and isn't gaining weight not to worry about the intake. My son (5 months) nursed every hour for the first three months, then he started nursing every two and a half. Breastmilk is more easily digested then formula, and is digested more quickly. 

  

Thank you for the info about solids. That's exactly what I was talking about with the hungry/full information, but I did leave out the damage you could do to their little organs. I didn't want to post anything that I wasn't sure about. Thanks again! 

 
January 10, 2006, 11:58 am CST

*sigh*

Quote From: kendellsma

its not overfeeding ur child.. since i did it , if i was overfeeding my child and :messed up his hunger/full reflex" then my child should be over the average weight for his age and he isnt.  it doesnt mean that u are a bad mom or that u dont know what ur doing..... every mother has to figure out what is right for them and their child
Did I say you were a bad mom? No. Did I say you didn't know what you were doing? No. I just said that I wouldn't risk it. But if you don't give a mom who is asking for advice BOTH SIDES of the coin, she is making decisions based only on one side of the information, which means it's uninformed. I was giving her the OTHER side of the coin, the side you left out. If you were comfortable taking those risks with your child, that's your decision. I wouldn't. That's all I was saying. Take a breath and don't take things so personally. I never made any comments about your child or you as a mother, and I wouldn't even consider doing so. I just gave the other info, said that the moms I know who gave cereal in bottles and solids too soon had babies who overfed because their hunger/full reflex was confused and it didn't help them sleep at all. *Shrug* Not anything judging or mean in that, is there?
 
January 20, 2006, 8:50 pm CST

Co-sleepind

Quote From: triciat4

Co-sleeping is the norm throughout the world and throughout history. There is nothing wrong with having your children sleep with you. In fact, in most places thoughout the world they can't believe that this is even an issue with some people. Name me one other mammal mother that doesn't sleep with it's young. People need to realize that this type of parenting dilemma is really not a right or wrong issue (if it's done safely) but a cultural preference. And your husband unfortunately has gotten the eroneous idea that co-sleeping makes a child more dependent when in my experience (and the experience of the vast majority of the rest of the world) has been the polar opposite. When a child has their dependency needs met early on, they are ready to move on to independence at a much earlier age, and it is a true independence. When you push a child away, they will only cling tighter to you. I think it is incredibly ironic that your husband values independence so much and yet he wants to push your son out of your bed prematurely, and the result will almost certainly be clingy, dependent behavior and an anxious attachment.  

  

People might get their babies to "sleep through the night" at six months, but I can almost guarentee you they will be back as soon as you take that crib down. You can baby the baby, or you can baby the toddler. My first child asked for her own bed at 3 years old and was perfectly content to sleep it on her own from then on, no nightmares, no monsters in the closet, etc. The "experts" are wrong, listen to your heart, you know your child the best. I recommend reading "Nighttime Parenting" by Dr. Sears and "Mothering and Fathering: Gender Differences in Parenting." They are wonderful books, perhaps if you could get your husband to read them.... I think the key really is communication with your husband and educating him. Once he can understand that this will help your son develop emotionally and become more independent, he will probably relax and come on board with you. Good luck to you, I hope you can find a solution that works for your whole family. If your husband absolutely won't change his mind, and remains stubborn, perhaps you could consider a mattress on the floor of your room for your son? Good luck. 

  

  

  

I just want to say that I am so relieved to read that I am not crazy for having my 16-month-old son sleep with me.  We both sleep so well with this arrangement.  He will take his naps in the playpen, not the crib...go figure.  I am surrounded by naysayers of the family bed and they have tried so many tactics to brow-beat me into submission, but I feel like I am doing the right thing.  Evan, my son, is happy, bright, and as independent as I can expect a 16-month-old to be. 

  

I take comfort in knowing that I am not the only person who feels a touch overwhelmed at times, too.  I can rememeber early on when he started teething (at 4 months) not getting more than 2 hrs sleep at a time.  I nursed intil 12 months and only stopped because I was selected to donate bone marrow....but that is neither here nor there.  I guess my point is to say thank you to everyone that writes and laments and sympathizes with each other.  It's all too common for women to be their worst enemies, at least in the Marine Corps.   

  

My question is bottle-weaning?  My son LOVES his bottle.  You can see it in his blue eyes when he walks around the house playing with dogs with his bottle in hand.  He will takea  sippy cup, but he would really rather have his bottle.  My pediatrician wants him weaned by 18 months.  I guess I am confused.  I am sure if I were still breast-feeding he would give me a pat on the back.  I think that is ridiculous.  He also scolds me for co-sleeping.  I mean really scolds me.  Should I find a doctor that supports my parenting style?   

 
January 20, 2006, 8:56 pm CST

Hi there

Quote From: keekee

 I am a mother of one 16 month old child.  She seems to tell us what works best for her.  As a small infant we tried putting her in her crib, but she didn't have very long sleeps, so as parents we decided to co-sleep with her until she was ready to go into the crib.  At 11 months she seemed to tell us that she was ready to grow up a little bit more. This is when she started sleeping in her crib through the night, except through teething stages (which we are still experiencing).  We try not to take her out of the crib when she wakes up at night unless she seems to be in pain, we just rub her back or sing to her.  We also moved the crib right up beside my bed so that she would feel close to us.  When she gets used to this with no interruptions though out the night, we plan on moving the crib back to it's original place.  So I guess we are gradually helping her to sleep on her own.  I just believe sleep has a lot to do with your infant/toddlers behaviour, so I don't want to mess with it too much.

Thank you for posting that, keekee.   My son is 16-months old or there about.  Does your daughter talk much?  My son can IDENTIFY most things, (ex.  I can line up three flach cards and say pick the clock and he will).  He doesn't mimic much though.  He has like 6 or 7 words that he uses in the correct context.  I am not worried about his brain, I can clearly see sings of intelligence, I am just concerned that he is not verbal.  He likes to be read to and pays attention.  Do you think girls develop speech faster than boys?   

 
January 21, 2006, 4:11 am CST

Where Should Your Child Sleep?

Quote From: evansmom04

Thank you for posting that, keekee.   My son is 16-months old or there about.  Does your daughter talk much?  My son can IDENTIFY most things, (ex.  I can line up three flach cards and say pick the clock and he will).  He doesn't mimic much though.  He has like 6 or 7 words that he uses in the correct context.  I am not worried about his brain, I can clearly see sings of intelligence, I am just concerned that he is not verbal.  He likes to be read to and pays attention.  Do you think girls develop speech faster than boys?   

Typically, yes, girls develop speech and vocabulary skills faster then boys. But my daughter, who is now 2, barely spoke until right around the time my second child was born, five months ago. She only said words like, "Momma, Dadda, juice," etc. Don't worry too much about your son. 

  

I also want to comment on your first post, in which you ask if you should find a doctor who respects your parenting style. YES YES YES! While I was able to wean my daughter from her bottle at 12 months, you shouldn't worry too much about your son and his bottle. And you should NOT have to listen to your doctor, who is supposed to support and help you, scold you for making a parenting decision that you and your child are comfortable with. 

 
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