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Topic : Picky Eaters

Number of Replies: 190
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Created on : Thursday, June 30, 2005, 01:19:25 pm
Author : dataimport
Is your child a picky eater? Share your tips, tricks, and menu ideas to help your child eat right, and enjoy it.

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January 27, 2006, 9:19 am CST

Picky Eaters

 And by the way, the doctor did not say give the kid solely Pediasure. The doctor said to offer the kid food and fall back on the Pedisure if the child wasn't eating. This is precisely what I am advocating. GO WITH THE PROFESSIONAL.  See I can type in CAPS too.
 
February 1, 2006, 12:11 pm CST

Thanks

Quote From: jettav

Maybe try veggie burgers (vegatarian isle-won't be much of a selection) and see how he likes those. My husband is not a vegatarian but loves the veggitarian pepperoni, maybe that as well? Does he like soups? I am not a real fan on canned soup, but my kids and I love tomatoe soup which I will fix on occasions when I feel like they haven't had enough veggies, you can probably make it as well. You really can't make him do anything so at least he is taking vitamins, one thing that I like to fix is a recipe on the bisquick box, it is the hamburger pie-1 lb ground beef,1 large onion9chopped-about 1 cup, I use less then that),1/2 tsp salt ( I don't use),1 cup shredded cheese,1/2 cup bisquick, I ususally use just slightly more),1 cup milk, 2 eggs. Of course you cook the beef and onion togetehr, drain and put into a greased pan and then pour the remaiover top of the beef and then spread the shreaded cheese over remaining ingredients (already mixed with the exception of the cheese), I add a touch of spaghetti sauce into the ingredients to give it more of a moist taste), bake it for about 30 minutes or so. you could add whatever else you want, and maybe he will eat this. My youngest child will only eat brocolli if I chop it up super fine, and mix it in something, you can't even hardly see it. You can probably get a vegetarian cook book as well, maybe find some recipes.

Thank you  

I will try that 

that's great advice 

 
February 6, 2006, 1:13 pm CST

only pizza

my boyfriends 8 year old son refuses to eat anything except pizza.  he'll eat spaghetti and egg rolls and peanut butter sandwiches.  I think that's his whole diet.  he will not try anything new.  how can we encourage him to try new things?  I don't think he's getting the nutrition that he needs.  the other day we told him he could have more pizza if he ate a couple tablespoons of stew and a cherry tomato and a piece of pizza.  he took a bite out of the tomato and then told us he could not eat it so we didn't make him.  he did eat the stew, except for a mushroom.  help!
 
February 14, 2006, 2:40 pm CST

had a picky kid, too

Quote From: austineli

my boyfriends 8 year old son refuses to eat anything except pizza.  he'll eat spaghetti and egg rolls and peanut butter sandwiches.  I think that's his whole diet.  he will not try anything new.  how can we encourage him to try new things?  I don't think he's getting the nutrition that he needs.  the other day we told him he could have more pizza if he ate a couple tablespoons of stew and a cherry tomato and a piece of pizza.  he took a bite out of the tomato and then told us he could not eat it so we didn't make him.  he did eat the stew, except for a mushroom.  help!

Hi,  

I think it is great that he was willing to eat the stew, try the tomato and that you included his favorite as an enticement. 

  

This is a difficult problem, especially if parents' have defaulted to the child's diet of choice.  Our younger child was a picky eater.  Here is what we did to help her (and ourselves!).  We talked to her about it at a time when we were not eating or getting ready to eat.  No battles at the dinner table--it only makes it worse.  We told her that it was important for her to develop a taste for a lot of different foods.  We also told her that we understood that she thought that she did not like most foods and only liked noodles, bread and such.  We explained to her that if she did not try anything, she would never know if she liked it or not.  She was also told that she might not like broccoli, for example, at five years old, but that she might find out she liked it when she was six.  How would she know if she did not try it several times in her life?  So we told her this was our new rule:  she would be expected to try whatever was served.  We would not force her to eat.  However, there would be no special items made for her.  She could choose to eat or not to eat.  Of course, we made sure that she had those things she really liked to eat many times during the week.  This was highly effective.  She is 14 now and generally eats what we serve with some exceptions.   

  

The other suggestion I have is to get him involved in meal planning and food shopping.  At first, offer two or three choices.  What would you like to have for dinner tomorrow:  spaghetti, meatloaf or chicken?  Then let him choose the side dish or dessert.   

  

I grew up with an extremely picky brother.  My mom made whatever he wanted and he never had to eat what the family ate.  He is still very picky and difficult to please.  It is embarrassing to go to a restaurant with him because he almost tells the waiter how to cook the food (stay home!).  His kids are also very picky, to an extreme.  Nip it in the bud now!  Good luck...he is fortunate to have parents who want him to be healthy and happy. 

 
February 14, 2006, 2:50 pm CST

from a speech pathologist

Quote From: moramomof5

My daughter is 15 months old.  She is my 3rd child and there is 10 years difference between her and my 2nd daughter. 

It seems everything she eats she chews and spits out.  Her high chair or the floor seems to have more on them that what went down her throat.  I asked her Pediatrician and he said her weight was on target for her age and height, and that she actually has gained weight since her previous appointment (at 12 months).  He said she was fine and what she does it is fine for her.  Like some of the other postings, he said "she'll eat when she's hungry". 

I still worry though, what mother wouldn't.  But my husband and I have noticed that if the food has a texture to it, like pasta, ground beef, corn, etc., she chews and spits it out.  If it is smooth in texture, like yogurt, mashed potatoes and pudding, she will eat it fine.  I'm just wondering if it is the texture she doesn't like and not so much the flavor or if it could be she has a problem swallowing.  Maybe I am just paranoid! 

My husband suggested pureeing everything, I feel she has to learn to chew things so I cut her food in smaller pieces.  Any suggestions?? 

Hi, I am a speech pathologist with experience with kids who have oral motor issues including problems eating.   This post is just a general response as I do not know your child and cannot make specific recommendations for her.  However,  if you want information about a possible problem with food texture, I suggest you look into having her oral motor skills/oral sensitivity assessed by a speech pathologist who specializing in feeding.  Children can have oral sensitivity that affects what their food preferences due to texture, temperature, size.  There are ways to help children such as this to begin eating in a way that is more typical.  Sometimes children "outgrow" these sensitivities.   

  

On a personal note, my own daughter used to feel her food before putting anything in her mouth.  Some items "passed" her touch test...she did outgrow it.  I had and still have sensitivities to certain textures which can make me gag.   

  

Good luck to you. 

 
February 18, 2006, 9:28 am CST

3 yr old (almost) picky eater

My little boy also has an issue with textures.  It's almost like he never graduated out of baby food....most kids go on to the "second stage foods"....my kid never did.  He had an amazing talent for picking out the smallest lump.  No matter how fine you tried to mash food up for him he would "spit out" the solid part.  He was very slow getting any teeth and he is a late talker also.  As with many of the other posts I have read.....there are times he just doesn't even seem to care about eating.  His speech therapist has said what many of you have said....He won't starve himself but sometimes it sure seems that way.  He could really care less if he doesn't get his meals.......and it worries me to death.  I am going to try some of the suggestions you all have made (offering several different things.....I am guilty of making the things he has eaten and hoping for the best.....and not trying smoothies and V-8.  It's really helpful to hear from other parents that have been through this or are going through it now....sometimes you feel like you are the only one.  Thanks everybody! 

  

  

 
February 21, 2006, 9:22 am CST

Another thing to try...

Quote From: whereru

My little boy also has an issue with textures.  It's almost like he never graduated out of baby food....most kids go on to the "second stage foods"....my kid never did.  He had an amazing talent for picking out the smallest lump.  No matter how fine you tried to mash food up for him he would "spit out" the solid part.  He was very slow getting any teeth and he is a late talker also.  As with many of the other posts I have read.....there are times he just doesn't even seem to care about eating.  His speech therapist has said what many of you have said....He won't starve himself but sometimes it sure seems that way.  He could really care less if he doesn't get his meals.......and it worries me to death.  I am going to try some of the suggestions you all have made (offering several different things.....I am guilty of making the things he has eaten and hoping for the best.....and not trying smoothies and V-8.  It's really helpful to hear from other parents that have been through this or are going through it now....sometimes you feel like you are the only one.  Thanks everybody! 

  

  

i want to let you know that i totally relate!!  I have been struggling with picky eating with both of my kids for 3 years.  I was on another picky eating board recently (i am ALWAYS looking for suggestions) and another mom of a toddler suggested a DVD that really helped her.  i bought it on amazon and i showed it to my kids.  my daughter especially (she is 3) really took to it.  the whole thing is real kids eating and enjoying foods.  she tried a couple things to "be like the kids on tv".  there is one part where the kids are dancing to great music with life sized fruits and veggies and other kids are eating the fruits/veggies.  my daughter tried apples and broccoli -  i couldn't believe it.  anyway, that is my suggestion of the day!  any others are appreciated - every meal is a struggle with my kids!!!  good luck - the DVD is called "it's time to eat" by tinyguides.
 
February 25, 2006, 3:16 pm CST

Anorexic 3 yr. old???

    My daugher is 3 yrs. old and all she will eat is apples and toast (only white italian bread). Sometimes chicken nuggets, too. We have tried EVERYTHING. The problem is she won't even TRY anything. She is somehow getting some nutrition because she is very healthy, but it is very frustrating. When she was a baby she was a very good eater. Everyone says she will out grow this, but I get worried. Any suggestions?
 
February 28, 2006, 5:42 am CST

same thing with my boys

Quote From: trinasmama

    My daugher is 3 yrs. old and all she will eat is apples and toast (only white italian bread). Sometimes chicken nuggets, too. We have tried EVERYTHING. The problem is she won't even TRY anything. She is somehow getting some nutrition because she is very healthy, but it is very frustrating. When she was a baby she was a very good eater. Everyone says she will out grow this, but I get worried. Any suggestions?

I had the same problem with my boys.i was worried that they wouldn't get enough nutrients throughout the day. I asked my doctor about supplementing what they eat and h e suggested Carnation Instant Breakfast with their meals. It tastes like chocolate milk and they loved it. As she gets older (4,5,6) I would recommend feeding her the same thing the rest of the family eats for dinner, have some jello or pudding for desert. If she tries something new and doesn't spit it out (2 or 3 bites at least). she gets her desert. I do not recommend big sugary deserts like cookies and brownies. Pudding will give her a serving of dairy and jello tastes good, but won't addict her to sugar. Very important when you start to do this that you do not have too many snacks during the day, it will defeat all your efforts at dinner.  

  

Do not expect her to eat a lot at one time. Young kids eat very little at meals compared to what adults eat. Try various fresh fruits also. Pears look alot like apples when cut up. She may not even notice the difference. Melons and grapes have always been a hit with my boys as well. Get a melon baller and serve her watermelon, cantaloupe or honeydew balls. My boys think those are really cool. It takes about the same amount of time as cutting the melons into bite size pieces. 

  

Good luck, I know what a rocky road you are traveling. 

 
March 1, 2006, 4:03 pm CST

find new friends...

Quote From: sleepyjeen

My wife and I are friends with a couple whose child is literally out of control. Should we say something? Here is the problem:

This child is almost four years old. He does eat regular food: no fruits, no veggies, no meat, no rice, no side dishes. His entire diet consists of bottles of pediasure for lunch/dinner (often times three bottles at a time), T Zone energy bars (mint chocolate flavor), M&M candies and chocolate pretzels for snacks, chocolate sandwich with nutella, and sometimes oatmeal with condensed milk. Whenever we dine out with this family, the mother does not order food for the child but gives him snacks from her purse: chocolate pretzels, brownies, and candies. Of course soon enough the kid is jumping around on the seat and won't listen.

The worst example of bad parenting occurred when my wife went to a chinese restaurant with the mother and child. Instead of giving the kid some rice, fruit or chicken, she served him fried dough covered with conventioner sugar. The child proceeded to lick the sugar off the fried dough and demanded more. The mother too busy with her own plate pulled several sugar packets from the table dispenser and emptied them ontop of the licked clean fried dough. The child then continued licking.

This problem has not gotten any better. When we sat for the kid, we offered him vegetables and fruit; he ran away and had a tantrum. The father refuses to do anything about it; he told us he doesn't push veggies and fruit on the kid because of the choking hazard.

What worries me is that the mom is diabetic and overweight. This child is destined to follow the same path if the diet is not changed.

What can we do?

If the child's parents are not concerned - even after you have brought it to their attention, why are you still trying to fix something you have no control over? Maybe it is time to find new friends that you and your wife will enjoy being around. 

 
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