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Topic : Raising a Special Needs Child

Number of Replies: 715
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Created on : Friday, July 01, 2005, 12:48:15 pm
Author : dataimport
Do you have a child with special needs? Share your advice and support with others raising a challenged child.

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January 7, 2008, 7:41 pm CST

Raising a Special Needs Child

Quote From: brytonedbyasd

 We have truely been blessed with our little angels. Only another parent understands how emotionally draining it can be to care for a child with Autism. We also get to experience thing with our little angels that is so humbeling and rewarding in ways that not just anybody would understand or appreciate. This is why God gave you a special son, because he knew that it would only take you looking at your son jumping over daily obsticals and sometimes stumbling and even falling to say if he can press on another then so can I. You must of done something pretty impressive for God to give you the honnor to raise, mold/hold, and love him in this life! CONGRADULATIONS! Now enjoy your blessing and continue to help others see theirs. Thanks for passing on your special story an keep on passing it in tears for lots more years, that is absolutly a perfect discription of a perfect emotion. Keep your head up and SMILE!  BRYTONEDBYASD aka Jami

I do not have a child with Autism, my daughter has SBS. When I was told God only gives this to parents that can handle it, it made me angry at God. I think my advice would be its ok to grieve. Just don't let it cripple you. Cry, write it down, punch a pillow, pray, then wipe your tears and remind yourself there will be better days. There are times when you just live from one moment to the next and times when you can live one week to the next. I guess I just have faith that the road may be hard but in the end it will work the way God has planned. I dont know if that helps at all.

 

Jessica

 
January 8, 2008, 5:45 pm CST

My 3 yr old has ADHD

My daughter has severe ADHD. She was diagnosed at 2 years old it was so bad. She has no impulse control, she is hyperactive, her attention span is 6 seconds(it was tested) and she is rude, disrespectful, basically we cant take her out with us. I love her very much but I dont know how much more I can take. She was on meds but her phychiatrist had her on anti-pyscotic meds. I had to put my foot down when she tried to put her on lithium! Gracie can be very sweet but the moments are few and far between. She will spit on complete strangers, tell you to shut up, and if you try to discipline her she will tell you to get your hands off of her. I have tried everything. I have read so many parenting books, watched Dr.Phil, gone to OT, BT, PT, a phychiatrist, a phycologist, a play group for children with behavioral disabilities. At home I have tried time out, redirection, postivie reinforcement, rewards, smiley charts, spanking, firm talkings, EVERYTHING! when I do anything good or bad she calls me stupid and spits in my face, If I pop her face she smacks me back. I dont know what to do for her. I know who she can be, I just dont know how to help her get there. Any moms out there that can relate PLEASE help me. I have another baby on the way and I need to stop this behavior before it gets worse. Thanks.
 
January 13, 2008, 3:55 pm CST

Son with ADHD/daughter with special needs

I'm the blessed mother of two children with special needs. My son is 6.5 yrs old and has ADHD, speech delay, fine and gross motor delay. When Joe was born I knew he was special. By the time he was 1yr he was extremely hyperactive. I thought boys just were more full of energy. Joe always did not do well in large groups growing up or daycare settings. when he was 3yrs old ,at the advice of the pre-school program we enrolled him in, we had him tested. The school basically told us they could not handle Joe in a class of 20. To our disbelief, we were told our son was at high risk for ADHD, severely speech delayed, and had some motor issues. It was recommended Joe start therapy in a program asap. Until kindergarten ,Joe went to a integrated pre-k and received speech therapy. By the time he was ready for kindergarten ,Joe was placed in a self contained special ed class with the primary focus on speech. Then soon after OT, and PT followed.

 

When it was time for first grade Joe was placed this year in a regular general ed class, but there are 5 children with identified special needs. There is also a special ed teacher ,and a teachers aide as well.  Joe has academically soared in this class. He is extremely gifted, however, the ADHD seems to inter fer in his ability to focus. Joe needs much redirection and extra support. He is still receiving OT, PT, but he is still receiving speech therapy, but in a group setting. Joe's delay is pragmatic, which is directly related to his social language skills.

 

I became more concerned this years due to Joe's increased behaviors and not seeing any type of improvement. Joe has become increasingly loud, disruptive, defiant, abusive to his little sister, and frequently using inappropriate voice tone,language, and carrying on conversations with himself while my husband and I would be having conversations. He always interrupted, does not like to take turns, always has to be first and cheats when ever he plays games. The funny thing is, he would behave differently at school due to the more controlled environment, but at home his behavior has become more alarming.

 

I brought Joe in to see our Pediatrician hoping he would refer Joe for his long awaited visit with a Psychologist to try to sort out what these behaviors and compulsions he has been displaying were coming from. I felt the school has been just dealing with Joe and his problems needed some other sort of attention. This is when our doctor suggested we place Joe on Ritalin. My heart sunk! I knew this day may come but I was not prepared for it. I felt like a failure as a parent. I became very worried about what would happen to my precious boy? I thought maybe he would be lost within the medication. I had heard over the years Ritalin has been much improved, but I was still frightened my son would be lost forever. We started Joe on 10mg 2x a day and the change was almost instant. Joe was still active but in a calmer sort of way. Some of those old behaviors just vanished. Joe also is improving daily at school. I was so worried Ritalin was going to steal my son from me but in-fact Ritalin has done the opposite, it has found my son! He was lost inside himself and Ritalin has brought him back to us. For all the parents afraid to give Ritalin a chance, don't be afraid.

 
January 27, 2008, 5:30 am CST

Raising a Special Needs Child

Quote From: gartshore

I have a 9 year old daughter with Down Syndrome and have also had to face this problem. At first I was very angry and upset about her masturbating but then got advice from my daughter's early ed teacher who suggested that I tell her that if she want to do this behaviour she must go in her room, repeat it over and over and eventually she got the idea. Now she does is hardly ever as she is a real peoples person and doesn't like being in her room alone therefor it has stopped.  It is a natural thing for kids with DS to do this at this age so please tell your sister DON'T get angry or upset with her just reinforce the fact she can do it but ONLY in her room.

Hope this helps.

I have a son with DS that is now 22 years old.  He used to even "take it out" in public it got so bad.  I can tell you that people with mental delays have little to no inhabitions and when it comes to something that is inately human (sexual gratification and feelings) you need to let your child know that it's normal and let her have her time.  I agree with the other post and I taught my son that under NO circumstances should he EVER do this in any place other than his/her bedroom...this was his "private time".  I taught him that sex was something between a married couple etc....and that if he wanted to "do that" he needed to go in private.  It worked beautifully after the first time!  He learned VERY quickly and he adjusted his behavior quickly. I think having a safe place, having someone that loves him talk to him about it and letting him know he was OK helped tremendously.... and he has no shame in that at all, nor should he.  His father (we are divorced) disagreed on this subject.  Why I have NO idea.  Let there be an open discussions with your daughter....believe me, you will be thankful in the long run. She will feel good about herself and not like a freak....and even though society has come a long way, some people are still "weird" about kids with DS or any mental retardation, so having the parent letting her know she isn't weird about that is going to let her feel good about herself...as she should. 
 
February 7, 2008, 9:19 pm CST

Cute stories on this topic

Quote From: casasue

I have a son with DS that is now 22 years old.  He used to even "take it out" in public it got so bad.  I can tell you that people with mental delays have little to no inhabitions and when it comes to something that is inately human (sexual gratification and feelings) you need to let your child know that it's normal and let her have her time.  I agree with the other post and I taught my son that under NO circumstances should he EVER do this in any place other than his/her bedroom...this was his "private time".  I taught him that sex was something between a married couple etc....and that if he wanted to "do that" he needed to go in private.  It worked beautifully after the first time!  He learned VERY quickly and he adjusted his behavior quickly. I think having a safe place, having someone that loves him talk to him about it and letting him know he was OK helped tremendously.... and he has no shame in that at all, nor should he.  His father (we are divorced) disagreed on this subject.  Why I have NO idea.  Let there be an open discussions with your daughter....believe me, you will be thankful in the long run. She will feel good about herself and not like a freak....and even though society has come a long way, some people are still "weird" about kids with DS or any mental retardation, so having the parent letting her know she isn't weird about that is going to let her feel good about herself...as she should. 

I worked with a charming little seven year old years ago who was diagnosed with autism (today they would call it Asperger's). I had to have a little talk to him about masterbating in the classroom and told him that he couldn't do that in front of other people. He said, almost in a whine, "But it feels so good!"  Out of the mouths of babes, I guess. :)  I explained to him that it was like going to the bathroom--something you do by yourself when other people aren't around. He got the idea, but it had become a habit. It's not easy to break a habit--especially when "it feels so good!" Improvement is what I was looking for. In the classroom, it was often a matter of giving him something else to do with his hands (one of those squishy balls to play with) or giving him a code word or gesture that no one else would understand that would let him know he was touching himself.

 

Here's another funny one:

Two well known professionals in the disability field were taking their young adult son with autism and mental retardation to a gathering with some high-ranking public officials. His parents had prepared him well. When the woman who was hosting the party shook his hand and said hello, he said, "You are not supposed to touch yourself in public." The woman told him that was true.

 

These parents don't hesitate to share this story when they speak at conferences. They laugh, and so does the audience. If it weren't socially taboo, probably we wouldn't think a thing about seeing people with their hands down their pants on the bus or at a business meeting. Pretty funny thought, isn't it? One of the wonderful gifts kids with disabilities give us is an honesty about our humanity.

 

You parents seem to be getting a good handle on this issue (maybe not the best phrase). You are doing well to help your kids understand social mores. They are not going to be perfect at meeting those expectations, of course. Sometimes, it's okay just to laugh and realize you don't need to get uptight about what other people think.

 
February 7, 2008, 9:58 pm CST

God smiles

Quote From: faris310

I do not have a child with Autism, my daughter has SBS. When I was told God only gives this to parents that can handle it, it made me angry at God. I think my advice would be its ok to grieve. Just don't let it cripple you. Cry, write it down, punch a pillow, pray, then wipe your tears and remind yourself there will be better days. There are times when you just live from one moment to the next and times when you can live one week to the next. I guess I just have faith that the road may be hard but in the end it will work the way God has planned. I dont know if that helps at all.

 

Jessica

I know this thought provides comfort to some people, but I know some of these kids are in dysfunctional, abusive homes that only become moreso from the stress of the disability. I can't get my head around the thought that God would "choose" these parents as special people to raise these kids. (I do believe these children can grow up to bring good from their past, as we all must learn to do, but I don't think God ever wants a child to have parents that are abusive.)

 

I have encountered many parents, like so many I see on this forum, who choose to see these children as drawing them closer to God for many reasons. They might have challenging days, but they are thankful for what they learn about themselves and others because of those days. They enjoy the gifts these children bring to their families--gifts that overpower the limitations. They shine a light on those gifts for society. They get angry, frustrated, and tired at times and even experience false guilt because they are human. However, they choose to keep their focus on the bigger picture of the potential these children have, not to be "special" as a euphemism, but to be special because they are. The spirituality in these families is remarkable and inspiring--most of the time, they don't even realize it. I think God smiles at those families, not because He specifically placed a child that has an illness, severe injury, or disorder with them, but because they have chosen to bring so much good from the lives of their children with disabilities.  Of course, this is IMHO.

 
February 13, 2008, 8:26 pm CST

Help Me please!!

    I need help. I have a son who is ADHD. He is on medicine the stuff he was on worked great. He was able to function.  The problem is one of my family members started taking it or stealing it I should say. They would only take a few but became more greedy!  Well the problem is the doctor said no more refills we'll try a different med.  I really feel I should hang my family or turn them in to the sherrifs office. They just don't steal meds from my house they also do it to other family members, and it doesn't stop with drugs

   Would you turn them in or tell them you know it's them taking the drugs. Please help

 
February 18, 2008, 10:46 am CST

my baby girl has autism--help

My baby girl is 10 yrs.old now and she has severe autism.  She has recently started throwing temper-tantrums and throwing things and hitting herself. She initially stopped this when she was 4 yrs. old .  She can't talk an i know is frustrated but how do i make her stop hurting herself.
 
February 21, 2008, 1:27 pm CST

child with autism

My son is 3 and has several behavior problems.any suggestions?
 
February 21, 2008, 1:31 pm CST

Raising a Special Needs Child

Quote From: lilmommi

My baby girl is 10 yrs.old now and she has severe autism.  She has recently started throwing temper-tantrums and throwing things and hitting herself. She initially stopped this when she was 4 yrs. old .  She can't talk an i know is frustrated but how do i make her stop hurting herself.
My son is 3 and does the same thing.his occupational therapist had some good suggestions and tools for us to use.
 
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