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Topic : 08/28 Hurricane Katrina: One Year Later

Number of Replies: 127
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Created on : Friday, August 25, 2006, 10:13:32 am
Author : DrPhilBoard1
Dr. Phil travels back to New Orleans, one year after Hurricane Katrina wiped out entire neighborhoods. He meets with FEMA director David Paulison to see first hand how the city is progressing. Touring the temporary housing in a trailer park, Dr. Phil and David hear from residents about their frustrations with FEMA. Then, Dr. Phil meets with a couple who says they had a picture perfect marriage, until Hurricane Katrina destroyed their lives. Brent and Stephanie relive the horror of what they witnessed a year ago. How is the stress of trying to rebuild their lives affecting their marriage and the health of their 2-year-old daughter? Then, Dr. Phil meets with Police Chief Warren Reilly in the Lower Ninth Ward, a neighborhood that was decimated when the levees broke. How is the rebuilding of the levees coming along? How is the mental and emotional health of the New Orleans police officers? Then, you’ve got the best seats in the house at a huge concert event to raise money for the first responders and their families. Brian McKnight, Brooks & Dunn, Jeff Foxworthy and Allen Toussaint come out to show New Orleans a good time in support of New Orleans Police Department, Fire Department and Emergency Medical Services. Talk about the show here.

Find out what happened on the show.

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August 26, 2006, 5:35 am CDT

Katrina Chnl.20 Special

I viewed a Special Report on Chn. 20 PBS last night (Friday Aug. 25th) Featured was the Lindy Hospital and its Staff during the crisis.  The physician in charge equated it to the Holocost when

having to determine who gets saved (when help finally arrived days later) by having to write "A" on their foreheads for ambulatory, B wheelchair bound and C...critical and those, of course. were the last to be rescued .

 

As the doctor put it best, he couldn't believe he was in the US of A..".where was the calvary to help

them as the days passed, this isn't a third world country we live in."

 

We can only hope they (FEMA-government) has learned a valuable lesson, but as Nader put it so uneloquently, our government can't even fix a hole in the ground.

 
August 26, 2006, 7:44 pm CDT

The effects of Katrina

 Hurricane Katrina's devastating effects were felt in more places than where she wrecked havoc.  I am from New Iberia, La. which is approximately 2 1/2 hours from New Orleans to the west.  We felt wind and rain bands from Katrina.  We experienced the fury of Rita nearly one month later.  But Katrina affected in ways that some people have never seen.  I was scheduled to do an E.P. study of my heart in New Orleans last year.  The appointment was scheduled originally for Aug. 19.  It got rescheduled around the same time Katrina was coming, therefore it was rescheduled for the first week in Sept.  Katrina came through and I have literally not heard another word from the doctor.  I think of the countless thousands of patients who were traveling to N.O. as I was who have been left as I have, to start all over from square #1.  Thank God that I have great faith in God, but what has happened to all those who don't.  Where are they and are they still alive???
 
August 26, 2006, 9:46 pm CDT

I wish I could know where they are

Last September I volunteered for a week at the River Center shelter in Baton Rouge. I am a nurse with a specialty in homebirth, so I was living at the shelter, and along with a midwife and a doula, we were doing what we could for the pregnant women and young mothers. In that short amount of time, I grew very fond of some of them, and of some of the Red Cross volunteers. The last couple of days that I was there, I carried around a notebook and copied down some of their email addresses. But on the last day, in the rush to catch my train, I left the notebook behind. When I got to the train station, I tried to contact someone to rescue the notebook for me, but they were unsuccessful. It's been so hard to be so cut-off from almost all of them, with no way to figure out how to contact them. Some of them were due to move to that trailer park near Baker, Louisiana. I will try to find a way to see this show, so that I can see if I catch a glimpse of someone that I knew there. I wish that there was some kind of message board where Katrina shelter friends could find each other. But I think that to do so with confidence we'd have to post our pictures with each post. Thanks for doing this show, Dr. Phil.
 
August 27, 2006, 12:06 am CDT

New Orleans

I just returned from New Orleans on a mission trip with my church.  We stayed in the French Quarter which was not affected by Katrina.  We did tour the area of devastation which was awful but we had to look hard to find it. 

It seems half the people of NO are removed and have no desire to return. The people who are there are dealing as best they can.  We had many people tell us that as bad as the worst area tooked, Mississippi had it a lot worse. These are the people in the French Quarter who now have rajor wire around their homes.

It really frustrates me that everyone focuses on New Orleans when Mississippi had the worst part of Katrina.  New Orleans was spared except for the levees breaking. and the people with their hands out waiting for the government to bail them out. 

Apparently Houston has twice the crime rate it had before Katrina (murders are up 18% which Houston police have atrtributed to evacuees from NO) while New Orleans has half the crime rate it had.  Although the night our church group pulled out from Vieux Carre Baptist Church,  there were  eight people murdered no more than 2 blocks away.  The National Guard had been obvious everywhere we went.  Apparently they had been called out the week before we arrived because of previous murders. 

So...if half the people have left and now live in elsewhere and are committing crime there - what does that tell you?  Of course. with a mayor like they have - who can't even see the difference between September 11th and the levees breaking in New Orleans and doesn't know how to MAKE the people leave, what could we expect?

Those people are accustomed to staying in bars and partying whenever a hurricane hits so they disregard what anyone says.  Then when their rental property is flooded they expect someone to bail them out.

 I had never been to New Orleans before the last week of July (although I voluneered with the Salvation Army and the American Red Cross after Katrina hit) the architecturet impressed me,  and  I saw the areas of devastation, I still see no reason for the hoopla especially when here are people in Mississippi who have not received the attention and help they deserved althogh they were more devastated than NO.  They helped themselves and didn't beg. That's the differemce betweem the mentalities of the two states and  the people who run them..

Thanks!

Cathy Pritchett

 
August 27, 2006, 12:21 am CDT

You can rebuild a house faster than you can rebuild lives...

Dr. Phil, 

We (Western Colorado Disaster Relief) relocated over 100 families last year from Katrina & Rita.    I think it would be a good idea to cover what some of these people are doing to rebuild their future and why they have NOT gone back to New Orleans.  We have one family that has an Acute Cerebral Palsy Child 5 yrs old....  They lost everything - we are trying to raise funds to get them a van with a lift - Mickie's Van.   These are hard working people and are NOT working the system.  We have several stories - some good, some not so good.   There is more to the history of Katrina than what is or is NOT happening in New Orleans,  What FEMA has or has NOT done to help.

 

For some this was a blessing in disguise - a chance to get a new life they didn't know was out there for them.  Some have seen snow, skied, walked in the mountains, seen trees change in the fall, camped, fished, rafted - so many things they or their families have never done and only saw on television.  Yes, some have gone back, but the children now know there is another part of the world open to them.

 

When we went to the shelters to offer help and relocation, many of the PARENTS didn't even know where Colorado was.    There is a story beyond New Orleans, I would sure like someone to tell it....

 

Jan France

WCDisasterRelief@aol.com

WCDisasterRelief.org

 

 

 

 
August 27, 2006, 4:47 am CDT

Everything Has Changed

I live in Slidell,  Louisiana where the eye  of Hurricane Katrina hit. Ours was one of the hardest hit parishes, but i believe people have forgotten how bad it really was around here. We never hear of people talking about how Saint Tamman Parish still needs help. It's always New Orleans and Lakeview and Metairie. I have to say with the help of Mayor Ben Morris and the rest of our parish government, ours was the most successful in the clean-up and rebuilding in the aftermath of this catastrophe, but we are NO WHERE NEAR 100% and it's sad to say, but we may never be again. There is still a LOT to be done here. There are many who either have trailers to rebuild their homes but to not have the help from FEMA or their insurance companies and then there are those who never got FEMA trailers, but got help from insurance and FEMA but have to either live in hotels or rent a house or apartment at almost DOUBLE the pre-Katrina rates or live in their gutted homes while they try to piece things back together. There are still homes that some people have not touched either because they did not survive and no family members have taken care of it or they do not have the means to return or rebuild. Now don't get me wrong, it's not like we are in a third-world country out here. We have all of the modern conveniences that most cities have, but operating hours on most businesses have been shortened, like the 24-hour Walmart finaly started to stay open until 10pm a month or so ago. Another thing is that Because Saint Bernard Parish was and still is so just absolutely devastated, most of their residents now have relocated to Saint Tammany Parish which is the closest Parish to Saint Bernard that was habitable. Our Population has increased so much that the parish has had to put into effect their what was the ten-year plan for our roads and other such developments. the traffic is unbelievable. What used to take 15 minutes to get from place to place now takes 45-60. I am NOT at all trying to complain about the citizens of Saint Bernard being here, I used to live there and am glad that I have seen several of the people that I knew alive and making the best of this horrible thing that has happened to them, and this is a GREAT community, I would recommend anyone live here. Fortunately my home did not have the massive amounts of damage that most of the homes in our area had, but we did have some. Our insurance company claimed that we had not paid our premiums in over two years and would not cover ANY of the damged that were incurred. When we sent them the bank statements and paid checks that were sent to them, they did gives us a refund of the money, but thet did not in any way near compare to the amount it took to repair the damages. FEMA gave us $800 TOTAL. Not all of the evacuees got the $2000.00 that everyone talked about. Not that I think it's the governments responsibility to reimburse anyone for evacuating, but I also don't believe they should pick and choose who they are and are not goint ot help. Also, I was told that my house was unliveable by FEMA and was told that I would get a FEMA trailer. There were several trees in the way of where the trailer needed to be placed and to remove them costs about $1000.00 per tree. Because FEMA closed my case after only giving us the $800.00 to repair our "unliveable" home, we needed every dollar we could get to repair our home. We also had a rental house that was deemed by FEMA as unliveable. and it was way worse than ours. the floors are falling through. FEMA gave the tenants a FEMA trailer but they don't give money for "businesses" so unfortunately, they are still living in the trailer because there are no vacancies in the parish. And the rentals that are available have doubled or more in their prices. I am not looking for pitty with my story, mine is not unique at all, I just want to give people a glimpse of what life has been like for thousandsof people in our community. It is a sad thing what has happened here. And to think, our city has recovered the fastest, can you imagine what it's like elsewhere, where the schools haven't reopened and hospitals are still not up and running, the houses are still piled up on top of each other in some neighborhoods, etc...................
 
August 27, 2006, 5:37 am CDT

Please - lets be fair!

I have heard Katrina nd New Orleans until I am sick of it.       Katrina didn't have a vendetta against New Orleans.  Katrina was a massive weather system that destroyed hundreds of miles. 

  Regarding New Orleans - This city knew well in advance that they were facing major devastation if a hurricane of any large magnitude hit and they chose to bury their heads in the sand about maintaining their levees and such.

   I don't want to downplay the devastation or the suffering in that city.  It is horrible what happened there.  But what I am so fed up with - everyone acts like ONLY NEW ORLEANS was hit.

  It is not the only place of devastation.  What about the towns in Mississippi that took the direct hit?  What about the air base.  What about the other areas that were destroyed?   And what about Punta Gorda and Port Charolette, Florida that took direct hits but no one flocked there to do shows.  Thousands are still affected by those storms 2 years ago but  you don't see special shows there.    I had family there and they are sick of hearing about New Orleans while they are trying to put their lives back together too.

   But in all honesty - If we are going to cover Katrina - take those cameras out of New Orleans and look at the rest of the areas hit last year by Katrina. 

Lets lift our eyes beyond the obvious and shed some light in the shadows to find the truley forgotten victims of Katrina. 

 
August 27, 2006, 5:44 am CDT

08/28 Hurricane Katrina: One Year Later

There is a special 2 hr show tonite about Katrina on the Discovery Channel at 9 pm ET if anyone is intersested. This is Sunday the 27th of Aug.
 
August 27, 2006, 7:37 am CDT

Agree With

I am so with the person who wrote Please-Lets be fair post.  I am so tired of everyone focussing on New Orleans.  I was raised in the Biloxi-Ocean Springs area of Mississippi what about them they got hit REALLY hard they lost homes and other things that were back from way back when that can never be replaced.  Everyone focusses on New Orleans when they do shows and what about all these other people that suffered too.  It is killing me that I currently live in Tennessee and can't not afford to go to my family in Ocean Springs to see the destruction that Katrina did to everything that I grew up with.  My grandma & uncle lost their homes due to flooding I have seen pictures on the Biloxi website that are just devistating to me. Yea, New Orleans got flooded but Biloxi got the flooding and the distruction from the winds and everything else too.  Where are all the talk shows and news people telling how Biloxi lost all of this and they aren't still saying poor us they are re-building their hearts out they had some of the Casino's up and running by the holidays they are getting the town back to what it once was to the best of their ability and no one is showing it.

 

 
August 27, 2006, 7:45 am CDT

I so agree

Quote From: gritlady

I have heard Katrina nd New Orleans until I am sick of it.       Katrina didn't have a vendetta against New Orleans.  Katrina was a massive weather system that destroyed hundreds of miles. 

  Regarding New Orleans - This city knew well in advance that they were facing major devastation if a hurricane of any large magnitude hit and they chose to bury their heads in the sand about maintaining their levees and such.

   I don't want to downplay the devastation or the suffering in that city.  It is horrible what happened there.  But what I am so fed up with - everyone acts like ONLY NEW ORLEANS was hit.

  It is not the only place of devastation.  What about the towns in Mississippi that took the direct hit?  What about the air base.  What about the other areas that were destroyed?   And what about Punta Gorda and Port Charolette, Florida that took direct hits but no one flocked there to do shows.  Thousands are still affected by those storms 2 years ago but  you don't see special shows there.    I had family there and they are sick of hearing about New Orleans while they are trying to put their lives back together too.

   But in all honesty - If we are going to cover Katrina - take those cameras out of New Orleans and look at the rest of the areas hit last year by Katrina. 

Lets lift our eyes beyond the obvious and shed some light in the shadows to find the truley forgotten victims of Katrina. 

I agree with you 100% this is not right that all you ever hear about is New Orleans I grew up in Biloxi/Ocean Springs Mississippi area and they were hit VERY VERY BAD and no one is talking them up they have not winned and cried they have rebuilt and still rebuilding they want to put the town back to gether and NO ONE is writing stories about them. I ABSOLUTLY think it is B.S.!!!!!!!! Dr. Phil or staff if you read this open your eyes go do a story on the other people that was hit a lot harder than New Orleans!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
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