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Topic : Asperger's Syndrome

Number of Replies: 125
New Messages This Week: 0
Last Reply On:
Created on : Sunday, September 17, 2006, 11:59:34 am
Author : DrPhilBoard1
If your child suffers from Asperger's syndrome, find support and share advice with other parents here.

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November 8, 2006, 1:47 am CST

milk allergy contributed to symptoms

My son is now 15 years old.  My husband and I realized he was different than his peers around the age of 6 but he was not diagnosed with Asperger's until he was 9.  I did research on this diagnosis and found that many children with Asperger's have itolerance to gluten and/or milk.  I removed mild from his diet and the change was dramamtic.  He had been "stimming" by flapping his hands in front of his face, pacing back and forth in our front yard and having many meltdowns.  These disappeared.

To this day I can tell when my son has eaten milk- (he never drinks it.)   There is milk in so many foods.  He is good at knowing what has milk in it.  Occassionally he will eat it anyway and he becomes depressed, irritable and angry. 

Try it parents! It might help.

 
November 8, 2006, 8:58 am CST

asperger syndrome

How many times as a parent have you asked you doctor questions regarding the development of your child only to get a response that you are an overly worried parent?  My son was diagnosed with AS when he was in 5th grade.  It was an expensive and a disheartening diagnosis.  The worst part was to hear the doctor state there is no medicine, opperation, or cure for his diagnosis.  I was told to not have high expectations for my son and to not put pressure on him.  I could not accept the outcome.  I researched AS and found Tony Attwood, Beth Kirby (OASIS on line support) a benefit.  I have chosen to be open to our family an friends and especially my son.  He is fully aware of his diagnosis.  He still has meltdowns, but we approach his behaviors differently.  We know his signs of a meltdown in the making.  We try to immediately redirect him before the outburst is in action. We model appropriate behavior.  We catch him doing something right we let him know specifically what was right.  I encourage him to talk to people.  He has to ask 3 questions to the person and listen to their answers and make one comment on their answers and then state 3 more questions. We have discussed signs of  all emotions to our son, so he can read people.  We discuss immediately behaviors that he displays that are inappropriate and we make him reinact situations the appropriate way.  I am happy to say that the last time he was at his counselor, she stated that he did not act like a child with AS.  This was a greatfeeling for him and the whole family.  No he is not cured, he has learned to control his symptoms and to understand people.  He is 14 know and knows his signs of a meltdown and he will redirect himself.  He has been teased and bullied.  He has seen the ugly side of people and he still has a great heart towards all people.  I feel that any child diagnosed with AS has a gift.  I have learned so much from my son.  He has made me more patient and less selfish.  My wish for all parents who have a child diagnosed with AS, do not feel like it is hopeless, it is not.  It is never too late to change behaviors, it may be harder, but never too late.  Do not give up on your child.  Do not take it personally.  Enjoy the gifts that your child has and he/she will succeed in life.  They can be anything they want to be with your guidance.

 
November 8, 2006, 9:04 am CST

Parent of twins with AS

This is my first post, and actually first visit to Dr. Phil's site, although I'm a longstanding fan of Dr. Phil.  Just posting a quick note that I have 17 year old identical twin girls with Aspergers Syndrome, diagnosed in 2000 after a VERY lengthy, tearful and discouraging pursuit of answers.  I'll post more on my story but just wanted to say to all parents out there who still are in the dark about this disability.... TAKE HEART!!!  There is hope!!!  This is not the end of the world.  These children are incredibly special and very capable of leading normal lives.  You are not alone! 

 
November 8, 2006, 9:49 am CST

We are definitely not alone!!!!

After reading the many posts from mom's with children who have Aspergers, Autism, and PDD , it is heartening to know we are not alone out there.  In 1992, when my son was diagnosed with moderate Autism, I was devastated and felt so alone. I live in a rural region of Nevada where at that time not even the teachers knew what to do with my son.  Being a teacher myself, I am a big advocate of education.  So I educated myself reading everything I could and attending seminars and workshops when funding allowed. My son is now 17 and doing quite well.  He is NOT cured and never will be but oh how blessed we've been.  I wouldn't trade this journey for anything.  It has had bumps and hills and mountains that have been climbed and sometimes gone around but I am grateful for each and every experience.  With the invention of the internet we can now know we are not alone and that though there may not be a cure there is a bright light at the end of the tunnel.  !!!!
 
November 8, 2006, 10:00 am CST

Support

Quote From: camilla54

I also am coping iwth asperger's synfrome. I am twenty-eight now. It has gotten easier to cope, but when I was younger my life was hell. I was socially inept. Unable to make friends. At first I never knew why. I just knew there was something wrong with me that the other children never could identify with. Unfortunately I had to navigate through childhood with the help of a medical professional. My mother was a single mom who was ignorant of the syndrome , she just thought I was a shy and awkward kid. I never did good in school, because the teachers did not have the patient or even tried to work with me on my level. The only thing I really exceled at was reading. I was reading large books at the age of four or fiv, by the time I was in middle school I was reading sophisticated novels like space odessy by isaax Asimov. Needless to say I love the library. I am hoping that many parents try to understand the effects of aperger's on a child especially socially and communicating with other's. As I remembered many adults did not particularly care for my atitude so they believe. I was always more independent than other kids, never tried to be the teacher's pet  and was happy when I was pursuing my own thing even in the middle of class. I was place in special learning diablities classes and programs such as studen timprovement programs and alpha a class for students with discipline and academic problems. The funny part, was that the teachers always remarked that I was a rather quiet kid, shy and awkward. No one understand. i am still struggling with academics. i am constantly challenging myself with new things. I am constantly focusing on the positive, but I still struggle with relationships. I never had a boyfriend and making friends with others does not motivate me much. However I know I must make friends and network. It is just really hard.  I never pick up on whether or not a person wants to become friends. When i do try, I find that I must disect them, mentally and physically, I want to know what makes them tick and all other things about them. I started living with two other roommates this past two months. I have lived on my own for eight years. I find that I close up even more. I don't have any support system, but I hope for parents of children living with asperger's syndrome know that that is the most important thing you can give your child.
Camilla, I hope you can find a support group for yourself.  Try various agencies in your area to see what is available.  No one should go it alone.  I live in a rural area in Nevada and there is a large support group here for individuals with disabilities.  My son is 17 and has autism and he already belongs to this group.  It's so important for you to connect with others who share your same concerns and understandings.  No one can understand what you are going through except for those in your similiar situation. 
 
November 8, 2006, 1:49 pm CST

Living with AS

Hello All.  Its been awhile since I visited Dr Phil's site and wow! right there on the home page a link to the AS message board.  I have a 16 yr old son who after every other diagnosis received the AS diagnosis in 2003.  The funny thing is that after many mental health professionals gave him their own diagnosis it was my research and "convincing" that got us the AS diag.  I often think they wrote it on the medical forms to make me happy...its now been 3 1/2 years of educating the DR's of exactly what AS is.  I have to admit that during a relocation to PA 2 years ago I was impressed with the knowledge of AS but remain concerned about the lack of programs within the Public Schools for these children.  I find that there is not an AS program.  They place the children in the Emotional Support, Learning Support or Mainstream classes and hope that is a good fit.  My son is in 10th grade and although the AS can still be challenging I have seen him grow, mature and develop into a wonderful youngster.  We still have our issues but I have truely been blessed by this child.  On those challenging days I just remind myself that God choose me to be his mother...not another mother alive but me.  That makes me feel as though I can go forward what seems to be a never ending battle.  This child with all of his innocencne and truth (even if I do not want to hear I have gained a few pounds) has taught me more than I can ever teach him.  I may not be able to protect him from the outside wor;d but I can create an environment here at home where he knows he is loved and respected for exactly who God made him.  I agree with all of the other parents...support is the most critical element in facing the challenges ahead.
 
November 8, 2006, 2:04 pm CST

Living with AS and raising an Aspy Child

Myself, my son, my family is affected by asperger's syndrome. I have it. My son has it. Half of my family has it. Is it hard? yeah it's hard. Sometime's it's pure hell. I had to learn to be socialized. AS didn't have the recognition it does today. My son, however, has been treated as "different". Did I do this? Yes, in part. But the school system effectively ostracizes kids who "march to the beat of a different drummer." It's hard when kids hurt my son for no reason other than at 15 1/2 physically, he's only about 10 emotionally... he plays with action figures.. he still cries when he gets in trouble.. he throws fits.. (that would do a 3 yr old proud) .. he takes meds every morning and every evening. And we deal with what comes up when it comes up. He's been clinically diagnosed as AS, ADHD, OCD, ODD, and BIPOLAR.... He's been hospitalized twice... all I can say is love them through it. Even when it's hard. Geo
 
November 8, 2006, 2:11 pm CST

something to think about

Quote From: mariett

How many times as a parent have you asked you doctor questions regarding the development of your child only to get a response that you are an overly worried parent?  My son was diagnosed with AS when he was in 5th grade.  It was an expensive and a disheartening diagnosis.  The worst part was to hear the doctor state there is no medicine, opperation, or cure for his diagnosis.  I was told to not have high expectations for my son and to not put pressure on him.  I could not accept the outcome.  I researched AS and found Tony Attwood, Beth Kirby (OASIS on line support) a benefit.  I have chosen to be open to our family an friends and especially my son.  He is fully aware of his diagnosis.  He still has meltdowns, but we approach his behaviors differently.  We know his signs of a meltdown in the making.  We try to immediately redirect him before the outburst is in action. We model appropriate behavior.  We catch him doing something right we let him know specifically what was right.  I encourage him to talk to people.  He has to ask 3 questions to the person and listen to their answers and make one comment on their answers and then state 3 more questions. We have discussed signs of  all emotions to our son, so he can read people.  We discuss immediately behaviors that he displays that are inappropriate and we make him reinact situations the appropriate way.  I am happy to say that the last time he was at his counselor, she stated that he did not act like a child with AS.  This was a greatfeeling for him and the whole family.  No he is not cured, he has learned to control his symptoms and to understand people.  He is 14 know and knows his signs of a meltdown and he will redirect himself.  He has been teased and bullied.  He has seen the ugly side of people and he still has a great heart towards all people.  I feel that any child diagnosed with AS has a gift.  I have learned so much from my son.  He has made me more patient and less selfish.  My wish for all parents who have a child diagnosed with AS, do not feel like it is hopeless, it is not.  It is never too late to change behaviors, it may be harder, but never too late.  Do not give up on your child.  Do not take it personally.  Enjoy the gifts that your child has and he/she will succeed in life.  They can be anything they want to be with your guidance.

we also term what T does when he has a behavior a "meltdown"... nice to know that there are other's out there... thnx for sharing
 
November 8, 2006, 3:04 pm CST

suggestion

I am a special education major  in my junior year and plan to work  with autistic kids from all over the spectrum. I also have an older brother with very low-functioning autism, so, needless to say, I know a great deal about this disorder.

I know a young man with Asperger's Syndrome and when I first met him, I could tell right away that there was something going on. When I found out it was AS, it was like all the pieces came together. I met this young man in the community theatre of my town and I would just like to say that participating in it has certainly improved his social skills with each show he is in. When I first met him, he seemed easily frustrated, trapped others in conversation, and did not know when it was time to let others have a say. Now, he is a freshman at the same university I go to and the last time we ran into each other, we only spoke for 5 minutes and he ended the conversation all on his own! I was so proud of him and each time I see his mom I let her know.

So do not lose hope of your child finding friends and social activities he or she can enjoy and participate in. It seems that theatre is an amazing outlet for this kid, so maybe it will work for your child. Good luck everyone!!
 
November 8, 2006, 3:14 pm CST

I Have it

I was recently diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome. It is very hard. I have been tested so many times. Many doctors thought that I would not succeed in school. I did not give up,and I graduated from college. People still treat me differently whether I cause it or not.

  My advice to parents,teachers,and doctors would be that they need to tell the child or patient that it is okay to be different and that it is not his or her fault. They also need to encourage him or her to reach any realistic goals  that are set.

 

I hope to someday be on Dr. Phil or Oprah to talk about my life in order to help others that may be struggling with this.

  

 

 

 
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