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Topic : 10/06 IQ Answer

Number of Replies: 118
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Created on : Friday, September 29, 2006, 09:49:49 am
Author : DrPhilBoard1
Have you ever felt like you’re running in place and going nowhere? What if you could learn some critical keys to increase your intelligence? Dr. Phil, along with Dr. Frank Lawlis, chairman of the Dr. Phil Advisory Board and author of The IQ Answer, gives you practical techniques to maximize your full potential. His first guest, Elizabeth, says she’s tried everything to wake up her daughter, Miranda, in the morning -- massaging her feet, splashing water on her face, even blasting rap music! Miranda says she can sleep up to 17 hours straight, and has lost five jobs because of her tardiness. Find out what happens when she gets a wake-up call -- Dr. Phil style! Then, Faith says her 17-year-old daughter, Myia, panics before taking tests. She gets headaches, stomachaches, and often comes home crying. Can Dr. Lawlis help the teen get over her fears? Plus, find out why Dr. Phil needs Dr. Lawlis’ IQ Answer, and learn important information every parent needs to know about retraining your child’s brain. Talk about the show here.

Find out what happened on the show.

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October 9, 2006, 5:32 pm CDT

wake up frequency

Dr. Phil mentioned a frequency that can help wake up the brain. I have a 16 year old who can't wake up either. I'd like to find out what the frequencies are and how to get them. Anyone know? Thanks.
 
October 10, 2006, 9:10 am CDT

I'm interested too

Quote From: pennsher

Dr. Phil mentioned a frequency that can help wake up the brain. I have a 16 year old who can't wake up either. I'd like to find out what the frequencies are and how to get them. Anyone know? Thanks.

My oldest son, my husband, and I all have a hard time getting going in the morning.  Multiple alarm clocks are our solution, but we are all zombies, which makes it difficult to get everybody out the door in the morning.  I, too, would be interested to hear more about the frequency thing...my brain could use a wake-up call in the morning (I have Narcolepsy, as does my oldest son.)  After my Narcolepsy medicine (Provigil) kicks in, I am awake.

 

Anybody with info on the frequency that can wake up your brain please reply.  Thanks

 
October 10, 2006, 12:49 pm CDT

Sleep disorders

Miranda could have been my daughter 10 years ago.  My oldest daughter had done great growing up and through her first year of college.  She complained about needing a lot of sleep and missing some classes, but I blew it off - thinking it was just college life.  Then we got a call from a psychatric hospital.  Our daughter had taken an overdose of cold pills, which they viewed as a suicide attempt. 

 

Come to find out she had gone to a doctor to see if anything could be done about her excessive sleeping.  (Much like Miranda she was sleeping 15+ hours a day, couldn't wake up even with people beating on the door)  The doctor decided she was depressed (the ONLY symptom was excessive sleeping) and put her on an antidepresant.  The medication muddled her mind so bad that she ended up in a psych hospital. 

 

I KNEW she wasn't depressed, but she was so unsure of herself by that time (because she was failing all of her classes) she dropped out of school and moved home.  Luckily she was still on our insurance and we took her to be checked out for a sleep disorder.  Sure enough, she was diagnosed with narcolepsy and placed on medication for it.  She improved almost immediately. 

 

She went on to graduated from college with a BS in Engineering, went on and got a MBA and her law degree.  She now practices patent law.  She will tell you that she can feel the difference when she hasn't taken her medication.  She has gone off the medication twice while she was pregnant and when she's not on the medication requires more sleep and is more sluggish.

 

When she was being worked up for a sleep disorder she spoke of her sleep problems much like Miranda - it wasn't the she wanted to sleep that much, it was that she just couldn't wake up.  At times she could actually hear the phone ringing or someone beating on the door, but just couldn't raise her consciousness enough to wake up. 

 

I also have 2 daughters younger than her.  One has ADHD.  I have learned a lot about sleep disorders since then - and was amazed to find our how close to ADHD they are (the medication used is the same).  My third daughter does have sleep issues, not as severe - we hope to have her tested soon.

 
October 10, 2006, 1:07 pm CDT

DSPS

Quote From: wahminal

I totally know what the girl with the waking up problem is going through.  I agree with some of the other posters that this is something that is a real problem and not the girl's fault.  I think the girl would benefit from a sleep study.

I myself have had a hard time waking up in the mornings all my life.  At least the girl actually heard the phone when Dr. Phil called -- I can't even do that!  I don't hear alarms, phones, etc.  I have numerous alarms going off in the morning and I don't hear them!  Also, I'm sleepy during the day and then at night, I'm wide awake.  At first, my Dr. prescribed Ambien to help me to go to sleep.  But, insomnia wasn't my only problem.  No matter if I take Ambien or not and go to bed at a decent time (I am a "night owl"), I do not hear alarm clocks and such.

If I worked outside the home, it would have to be a 3rd shift job or else I'd get fired.  What made me seek help is because of my problem my 1st grader was tardy a lot at school because I couldn't get up in the morning.  Finally, I got a letter from the Asst. Principal regarding the tardiness.  So, I sought help.

I have DSPS (Delayed Sleep Phase Syndrome).  This is also know as "Night Owl Syndrome".  It is a problem with circadian rhythm (internal clock).  I also have a mild case of Narcolepsy which explains the daytime sleepiness, but I can pretty much control that on my own -- my main problem is the waking up.

I think a separate show should be done on sleep disorders because they are real!  There are so many out there and they can go undiagnosed and the person just be called "lazy" and/or "depressed".  A sleep study can help with the diagnosis of whatever sleep problem you have.

As for my DSPS, there is really no cure for it.  All I can do is try to adjust my lifestyle around this disorder.  There are a few things that may or may not work such as light therapy and/or having a very strict schedule, etc., but none have worked for me.  The only thing that does work for me is taking Ambien to actually make me sleepy so that I go to bed at a normal time.  Then, it still doesn't help the waking up problem.  I don't want to be on sleeping medications all my life.

I hope that Dr. Phil can understand that sleep disorders are very real and I hope that he can air a show about it so that others may understand what theirself and/or their loved one might be going through.
I have never heard of this.  I may have to look into it.  I come from a family of night owls.  Luckily I'm an RN and work the night shift, so it fits nicely into my life - although my husband (who's a day person) would love it if I wasn't.
 
October 11, 2006, 7:18 pm CDT

Waking up

I related to the first guest who could not wake up in the mornings. I have somewhat of a different experience than what she described, yet a few similar symptoms. To begin with, I am a very vigorous dreamer for the most part. I have also experienced outside noises incorporating themselves into my dreams as she described. However, the most peculiar aspect of my sleep cycle is what I can best describe as a semi-consciousness between sleeping and waking up. When I am in this state, I am not quite lucid and am plagued with misconstrued priorities. For example, I will need to get up and get ready for work. I am aware of what my responsibilities are, yet my priority is to either stay in that state or fall back asleep. This is definitely not my norm. Usually, this will persist until I am overcome with anxiety once my normal thought pattern begins to surface. As a result, I am always rushing to get ready and many times running late. I can honestly say that I am displeased with my behavior and would much rather slow down and be on time. Also, on days that I do not have to be accountable, often I can sleep up to fifteen hours, sometimes more. I believe that the worst part about this conduct, is the skepticism and sometimes distaste of others who perceive this as laziness. For a long time I believed the same thing, but I am too self-critical in such circumstances to allow myself to continue if I could prevent such actions. I felt strongly about sharing this after I viewed the segment. I hope that if you experience something similar that you can find comfort in knowing that you are not the only one. I also want to express to those who cannot fathom this but know someone that exudes the same conduct, to please be understanding and supportive because that person is most likely disgusted of themselves.
 
October 12, 2006, 4:59 pm CDT

sleep disorders

Quote From: caseknife

I related to the first guest who could not wake up in the mornings. I have somewhat of a different experience than what she described, yet a few similar symptoms. To begin with, I am a very vigorous dreamer for the most part. I have also experienced outside noises incorporating themselves into my dreams as she described. However, the most peculiar aspect of my sleep cycle is what I can best describe as a semi-consciousness between sleeping and waking up. When I am in this state, I am not quite lucid and am plagued with misconstrued priorities. For example, I will need to get up and get ready for work. I am aware of what my responsibilities are, yet my priority is to either stay in that state or fall back asleep. This is definitely not my norm. Usually, this will persist until I am overcome with anxiety once my normal thought pattern begins to surface. As a result, I am always rushing to get ready and many times running late. I can honestly say that I am displeased with my behavior and would much rather slow down and be on time. Also, on days that I do not have to be accountable, often I can sleep up to fifteen hours, sometimes more. I believe that the worst part about this conduct, is the skepticism and sometimes distaste of others who perceive this as laziness. For a long time I believed the same thing, but I am too self-critical in such circumstances to allow myself to continue if I could prevent such actions. I felt strongly about sharing this after I viewed the segment. I hope that if you experience something similar that you can find comfort in knowing that you are not the only one. I also want to express to those who cannot fathom this but know someone that exudes the same conduct, to please be understanding and supportive because that person is most likely disgusted of themselves.

Please go get a sleep study done...it sounds as if you have a sleep disorder of some kind.

 

I have Narcolepsy, and I have trouble distinguishing my dreams from reality when I first wake up.  I also experience sleep paralysis when my mind is still awake...very frightening...a classic symptom of Narcolepsy.

 

Try googling sleep disorders, and get some info.  Ask your doctor for a referral to a sleep specialist...the sooner the better.

 

Provigil, for the Narcolepsy, has made a huge difference in my life, and my oldest son's life too...he also has Narcolepsy.

 

 
October 13, 2006, 3:54 pm CDT

CaseKnife and Miranda (from today's show)

Quote From: caseknife

I related to the first guest who could not wake up in the mornings. I have somewhat of a different experience than what she described, yet a few similar symptoms. To begin with, I am a very vigorous dreamer for the most part. I have also experienced outside noises incorporating themselves into my dreams as she described. However, the most peculiar aspect of my sleep cycle is what I can best describe as a semi-consciousness between sleeping and waking up. When I am in this state, I am not quite lucid and am plagued with misconstrued priorities. For example, I will need to get up and get ready for work. I am aware of what my responsibilities are, yet my priority is to either stay in that state or fall back asleep. This is definitely not my norm. Usually, this will persist until I am overcome with anxiety once my normal thought pattern begins to surface. As a result, I am always rushing to get ready and many times running late. I can honestly say that I am displeased with my behavior and would much rather slow down and be on time. Also, on days that I do not have to be accountable, often I can sleep up to fifteen hours, sometimes more. I believe that the worst part about this conduct, is the skepticism and sometimes distaste of others who perceive this as laziness. For a long time I believed the same thing, but I am too self-critical in such circumstances to allow myself to continue if I could prevent such actions. I felt strongly about sharing this after I viewed the segment. I hope that if you experience something similar that you can find comfort in knowing that you are not the only one. I also want to express to those who cannot fathom this but know someone that exudes the same conduct, to please be understanding and supportive because that person is most likely disgusted of themselves.

Caseknife and Miranda:  What you think is a sleep disorder, isn't.  My experience, from the day I was born, is that I slept, all the time.  My mom used to tell me that when I was a baby, I only woke up to eat.  As I got older, that didn't change.  I used to fall asleep at the dinner table, used to come home and nap again after daycare.  After school, until college, I would come home and sleep after school, and go back to sleep at night.  I could easily sleep 12+ hours a day.  When I got to college, I used to sleep in my math classes, wake up and give the prof the answer to the problem he had on the board, lol.  I would also sleep between classes, and sleep at night.

 

I didn't have a sleep disorder.  I have hypoglycemia.  Hypoglycemia is a blood sugar issue in which a person's normal blood sugar level is low.  Eating the wrong foods and eating too much sugar, can cause the blood sugar level to rise to a normal level, and then crash drastically, causing one to get tired or sleep very long hours.  It leaves a person feeling lethargic throughout the day, and causes the body to go into a sleep deprivation state.  That sleep deprivation state can cause people to gain weight (because they don't view food the same way, and thus, don't eat 3 times a day, throwing their metabloism out of wack), overreact to stress, etc. 

 

My suggestion is to get tested for Hypoglycemia.  It's a six hour blood test, but will be so beneficial.  People with hypoglycemia have to eat 6 small meals a day so that their blood sugar levels don't spike and crash, and will give them more energy all the time.  Also, drinking 64 oz. of water is necessary, for everyone, even if they don't have Hypoglycemia.  For those with Hypoglycemia, that haven't learned how to eat, LA Weight Loss has a plan specifically for hypoglycemics.  They work with dieticians and nutritionists and teach people how to level out their hypoglycemia.  One of my friends did this (she also has hypoglycemia) and lost almost 30 pounds.  Because of her experience, I started this plan and have lost 31 pounds so far.  I have soo much energy, it's not even funny.

 

It must be noted, for people with Hypoglycemia, alcohol isn't a good thing.  Alcohol is broken down into sugar by the body.  While it may keep someone awake and energized, it can also have devastating effects (Miranda, from the show).  It's like giving a diabetic alcohol and causes the same reactions.

 

Irish- Encourage your daughter to go to college.  She may just hate high school and feel as though she doesn't belong with the people at her school.  College is completely different from high school and she will love it, even if she starts at a community college and then transfers to a 4-year college.  Don't let her give up on her dreams because she dislikes where she's at right now.  There's a whole world out there for her to experience.

 
October 13, 2006, 4:05 pm CDT

Crosways

Quote From: crosways

I made it a point to watch Friday's show because I want to help my child improve academically. My daughter is 8 y/o and had recently been diagnosed with ADHD. She has been on medicine since August. I have seen only a little  improvement in her behavior (which is only seen when she first starts taking the medicine) and no improvement in her grades. My child is failing. I have contacted the school to have her tested for a second time to see if there is a learning disability. The first test showed she had some comprehension problems. She has her hearing tested which showed that she has some comprehension and processing issues. She goes to resource and speech but nothing seems to be working. I get very frustrated when trying to assist her with her homework. I know my frustration doesn't help the situation because she becomes frustrated. I believe that she may also have dyslexia because she says things backwards and she works he math problems backwards.

After watching the show on Friday I didn't feel encouraged that things could get better. I was more concerned. Because she is so hyper she dances all the time...she listens to music all the time (even when doing homework). I realize I need to give her something other than french toast sticks for breakfast to see if that helps her focus in school and try the breathing techniques.

I would love to know if there anyone has any suggestions on how to help her (US) with this dilemma.

It sounds like your daughter has ADHD and a processing problem, which is a learning disability.  It's very hard to diagnose, but my sister has the same thing.  The same frustrations you had, my mother had.  But, once you know that this is the problem, you can do something about it.  My sister just needed her teachers to give her the instructions one-on-one, and then she excelled.  As she got older, she learned to adjust and focus.  She recently finished her Master's with a 3.8 GPA.

 

I have never understood why parents give their ADHD kids sugar.  Because she has ADHD and is already hyper, giving her sugar is sending her over the edge!  Cut the refined sugar and stick to fruits (natural sugar).  Giving her a couple of eggs and some fresh fruit in the morning with a small glass of milk would be a good balanced meal to help her start her day.  Balancing out her diet will put her on a more even keel and help her focus.

 
October 13, 2006, 4:07 pm CDT

Hypoglycemia

I forgot to mention that a sleep deprived state can also lead to depression, etc.
 
October 13, 2006, 4:31 pm CDT

Ritehere

Quote From: ritehere

 I've been saying for years that sugar is bad, Bad, BAD for everybody and I've finally heard a well respected doctor come out and say it on an internationally televised program!
And not only that, the good doctor ALSO said in the same program that protein is food for the brain. This is the other fact I've been trying to convince others of for so long!

Thank you thank you thank Dr Phil and Dr Lawlis. It's high time we started feeding our precious children, and ourselves, in a responsible healthy way. Our total health depends on the balance of several aspects of which nutrition is only one. But it is a very important aspect that can be so easily implemented in those that depend on us--our children.

After seeing first hand how a diet without sugar and with more quality proteins turned my physical health around, I put my children and husband on it too. They balked but we've never gone back to the way we ate before. Everything is better--no hearburn, no sleeping problems, allergies faded to near non-existence, grades and attention spans improved, the list goes on and on...

I predict because of this there will be "breaking" news spots on the "controversy over sugar."
Take it from the doctors, or try it yourself. We were never meant to shovel in sugar all day and we are poisoning our children if we allow them to.

Well said and 100% true!  Refined sugar is bad for the body, mind, and spirit.  A well balanced diet is key to good health.

 
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