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Topic : 03/07 When Too Much is ... Too Much

Number of Replies: 422
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Created on : Friday, November 10, 2006, 09:20:25 am
Author : DrPhilBoard1
(Original Air Date: 11/15/06) Imagine discovering that your next-door neighbor owns over 200 cats. Ray and Dennis never thought their neighbor, Kristy, would let her pet collection get that big. Once friends, the three are now in a nasty and vindictive war because of the felines. Ray and Dennis say Kristy's property is one big, disgusting litter box, and they want Kristy to get rid of her cats. Kristy says she'll never part with her "cat sanctuary." Are Ray and Dennis playing dirty in order to run Kristy out of town? When is it too much, and where do you draw the line in the litter box? Then, Mike says his wife, Lori, keeps everything from used envelopes to empty food jars and medicine bottles, because she "might need it" in the future. He is ready to take desperate measures to put a stop to this. Lori says the thought of throwing her stuff out is her worst nightmare. Is Mike guilty of making nasty bribes to get his wife to change? What's really behind Lori's habit for hoarding? Tell us what you think!

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November 11, 2006, 6:03 am CST

too many over the time with cats

Dear all well to be honest here 200 is to many cats when you have alot you have to keep up with their litter boxes & their orders let's face it 200 is far to many cats ok me have cats & wont have to many ok it cost far to much money for the food & litter & the vet bills the cats have to be fix & cleaning cost money ok can see 10 cats but over 200 is far to much to handed have to keep up with it all me really do & wont never forget to clean after them everyday & night ok let's keep up with your cats food * orders ok all have  anice happy November to all  signing a big catlover
 
November 11, 2006, 6:07 am CST

have to keep your cat's healthy

always keep up withyour cats  clean your litter box each day &  night & feed them clean ffod  dishes & wash their water dish each time & fix all cats male & females & keep up with thei orders wah the floors & mats each time with bleach!!!!!!! love your home & cats keep all things clean !!!!!!! big catlover
 
November 11, 2006, 7:01 am CST

hoarding and cannot throw out stuff

Our son, age 49 and born deaf, holds a good job and lives in hi co-op apt. but I'm afraid he'll lose both someday.  He was evicted, a 2-year process, but we disovered it when they locked his door.  After many court appearances etc. tons of  newspapers papers were hauled out and he kept the apt. But he still has problems, made more difficult by his denial of problems until they become critical, and because he was born in 1957 when educators of the deaf believed in "the Oral Method", not allowing babies and toddlers to learn sign language!  It was he worst mistake in education of the deaf!  Most deaf people in his age group, taught orally and denied sign as young children are difficient in grammar and communication skills as a result of this.  His latest problem is losing the use of his car because his auto insurance bill got lost in the mounting pile of mail on his dinette table and insurance was cancelled for non-payment.  I'm trying to convince him that he must turn in his license plates immediately.  My husband, another procrastinator, is of no help.
 
November 11, 2006, 8:47 am CST

OMG!!! 200 CATS!!!

Well that is just CRAZY!!!  I love cats and I have six of my own and even that is too many!!  What is this woman thinking having this many cats??Now having not seen the show yet, I am guessing that these cats have never seen a veterinarian nor are any of them "fixed" and that they just run wild.  I am betting that they are multiplying like rabbits and that this woman just can't bear to get rid of any of them.  Trust me, I know how adorable baby kittens can be,  and I also know how difficult it can be to part with them (how do you think I ended up with six of my own little darlings??), but this woman is not being fair to those cats.  Cats need love and affection and there is no way that she can give them each all the attenttion that they need.  Not to mention what they are doing to her poor neighbors!!  I know how naughty cats can be.  They walk all over the nieghbor's cars, make litterboxes out of other people's yards and gardens, nibble on plants, and in many other ways make a nuisance of themselves.  What this woman is doing by keeping all these cats is downright inhumane, and not very neighborly.  And the sad part is that when the authorities get involved and remove these animals from her "care", most of them will be put to sleep.  Dr Phil, talk some sense into her!!
 
November 11, 2006, 11:16 am CST

When too much is ... too much

I agree. There are too many cats there. Isn't there a law in her area which states how many dogs, cats, etc. a resident or property owner can have?  I have a heart too. Our neighbor does not feed or spade their cat. I take her in when she gives birth and socialize her kittens so they can be adopted. I also tell people who adopt them about the various free spade and neuter programs in our area.
 
November 11, 2006, 11:36 am CST

RE: Too Much

  Oh my dear,  200  felines is just 198 to many, unless you have proper facilities, veterinary care  and staff for these cats you are endangering their lives.   I worked in the veterinary field so I have a bit of expertise in this area.  No one person can or should be housing that many cats.  It's impossible to keep them emotionally and physically healthy not to mention very expensive.  Even the owner's health is in jeopardy.  With this many felines they are creating disease amongst themselves. Feline leukemia is one  of the diseases that will be passed from one feline to the next and it will wipe out a colony of cats if the disease is not brought under control and if there are other cats in the neighbourhood they are also at risk if they come in contact with any bodily fluids from the infected animal.   My goodness I feel for the neighbours in the area I understand their frustration, however,  I don't condone their method of dealing with situation, (if in fact this is true), anti freeze is a very  slow painful death for cats and they love the taste so they will flock to it like bees to honey.  I've been witness to several felines that have accidentally consumed antifreeze from a leaky radiator. It's inhumane to do this. The better option is to work something out with this neighbour even if it means getting the Animal Societies involved. I am sure there must be a "quota" for the amount of animals one can own in a residential neighbourhood.  These animals have to be a nuisance to neighbours' digging in flower beds and defecating wherever they like. That's not fair to the community.   Good luck to you both I hope you will be able to come to a suitable agreement that will be favourable to all concerned including and especially the felines.   Sincerely, C. Anderson Canada
 
November 11, 2006, 1:20 pm CST

11/15 When Too Much is ... Too Much

Quote From: granoffive

Our son, age 49 and born deaf, holds a good job and lives in hi co-op apt. but I'm afraid he'll lose both someday.  He was evicted, a 2-year process, but we disovered it when they locked his door.  After many court appearances etc. tons of  newspapers papers were hauled out and he kept the apt. But he still has problems, made more difficult by his denial of problems until they become critical, and because he was born in 1957 when educators of the deaf believed in "the Oral Method", not allowing babies and toddlers to learn sign language!  It was he worst mistake in education of the deaf!  Most deaf people in his age group, taught orally and denied sign as young children are difficient in grammar and communication skills as a result of this.  His latest problem is losing the use of his car because his auto insurance bill got lost in the mounting pile of mail on his dinette table and insurance was cancelled for non-payment.  I'm trying to convince him that he must turn in his license plates immediately.  My husband, another procrastinator, is of no help.

I've seen this just the other day actually. A friend and I were asked to help this 80yr. old woman clean her apt. for inspection. We couldn't move! I actually had a panic attack! She keeps everything! She moved into her apt. 7 yrs. ago she said the boy who moved her in gave her a bottle of beer on that day ..... we found it in the fridge. She keeps egg cartons, milk jugs,broken styrofoam coolers. She has no room in her cupboards for dishes so she stacks them everywhere in precarious little stacks. We did what we could but there was so much more needing done. In her case, I think she's lonely and her "stuff" has become her companions.

I know what it's like to have a hubby who procrastinates. His motto... why do today what you can put off until tomorrow,after all tomorrow may never come then you'll have wasted the effort.

 
November 11, 2006, 1:46 pm CST

What? Another hoarder?

C'mon folks all over Ameica - enough with the animal hoarding and calling residential dumps "sanctuaries".

 

Compassion for a person who is mentally or emotionally or physically unable to recognize their compulsions to keep trash and compulsions to set themselves up as the only people on the planet who can "rescue" animals is one thing. 

 

But frankly, it gets to be a very "old" excuse when you have to live near it - smell it - wonder about insect infestation - feline leukemia or "whatever" - and other fire or health hazards.

 

This, as in all the other cases, when it was recognized should have been stopped immediately with no politically correct discussion and no legal delays while it travels through the court system.  Neighbors should be protected from this problem just as if the person was hoarding fireworks.

 

It's a recognized problem with a recognized pattern, with recognized health issues not only for human beings but for the animals, and it has a recognized outcome.  Eventually, the animals get yanked away, sometimes euthanized for various reasons, the house gets fumigated or condemned and it costs the taxpayers money to do it. 

 

This is ridiculous to keep coming up over and over again.  I remember hearing about "the cat" lady who lived near us when I was a kid decades ago.   This isn't exactly rocket science. 

 

Local governments - get your acts together.

 
November 11, 2006, 2:59 pm CST

TOO MUCH

Sorry to say but I would have to draw the line on this one, My family has a dog two kitties a bird and fish and I will say that maintaining all of these pets are not only costly but a very LARGE resposiblity, I could not imagine having 200 cats!!! I could imagine caring for them, feeding them and assuring that they are seen at the vets regularly...Sorry I dont blame the neighbors for complaining and I would do the same if I lived next door to this lady, That cant even be leagal, humane or sanitary living conditions... I look forward to what Dr Phil has to say...
 
November 11, 2006, 3:58 pm CST

I have family experience

I have personal experience with this type of thing and it is difficult to handle.  It seems that there is no family involved.  But as the family of someone who insists on hoarding, it tears a family up.

There were 20 cats, and 16 BIG dogs.  My mother felt that she was the only one who could look after these animals.

My dad had built a brand new house and it was full of feces and urine.  My mother never showered, she drank too much and constantly passed out in the middle of all this mess.  My dad is 66 and has Type I Diabetes, very brittle.

One day I get a call from him that he has to leave, my mother has kicked him out because he wants to clean up the house.

It took months and alot of money to get this disaster straightened out.  It meant going to court to get my Dad sole possession of the house.  The RCMP attended one of her numerous 'suicide' attempts, when she was so drunk she didn't know what she was doing and they reported the animals to the SPCA. The house was almost condemned by the Health Board.

After the animals were gone we got her an apartment and went to the order to the house and told her that she had to move, we had to fix the house and sell it.  My dad is so depressed and tired he can't work full time any more.  (I might add they lived 45 min away in a small town). Everyone knew about the house.  It is said but I actually had to tell my own mother that I would phone the police and have her removed if she returned to the house.

I am happy to say that she and my dad are living together again in the apartment only a few streets over from me. She does have to face charges on animal cruelty, mainly because she refused to euthanize animals that were obviously in distress.

I spent all my savings to get the house in condition to sell, but we still haven't been able to sell it, so my Dad is facing a financial crises.  Everyone in the small town knows about what happened and feels that house is unsanitary even though it has totally been renovated.

I have managed to help my dad get a deal with the bank for them to finance all his debt and hold off on taking any payments on any of it and the mortgage for 6 months, with the hope that the house will sell.

My mom has quit drinking and is trying very hard to deal with the chaos she has created, but she doesn't really get what all the damage is she has done.  And believe me this blowout was just the tip of that iceberg.

This a real problem for anyone who has to deal with it, but in all honesty the only way to deal with it is head on and with as much force as possible. Because someone who hoards doesn't get that it's a problem and you can't even start to help them until you get them away from it, so that they can feel a change in their life.

 
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