Message Boards

Topic : 11/24 Great School Debate

Number of Replies: 4215
New Messages This Week: 0
Last Reply On:
Created on : Friday, November 17, 2006, 12:57:50 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1
Parents want the best for their children, but what’s the best way to educate them? Dr. Phil’s guests face off in a debate about whether to school, homeschool or unschool. Dana and her husband, Joe, call themselves radical unschoolers. They say education happens as a side effect of life, and they don’t believe in tests, curriculums or grades. Are their three kids learning what they need to know? Then, RaeAnn says public schools are death traps and wants to homeschool her children. Her husband, Steve, says their kids are safer at school than they are at home. Can this couple reach a compromise? Plus, Nicole feels like an outcast at 26. She says she hated being homeschooled, and couldn’t relate to other kids. Share your thoughts here.

Find out what happened on the show.

More November 2006 Show Boards.

As of January, 2009, this message board will become "Read Only" and will be closed to further posting. Please join the NEW Dr. Phil Community to continue your discussions, personalize your message board experience, start a blog and meet new friends.

November 18, 2006, 4:05 pm CST

11/24 Great School Debate

Quote From: jettav

And I think this is a problem with a lot of schools, they "seem" to think that the bigger the school the better, but I think a smaller setting is better but of course that is my opinion and that is why I chose a school that is smaller in size. I still think my daughters class is too big but it is smaller then the school classes down the street that she would have went to.

The "bigger" is better philosophy really doesn't stem from best teaching practices. There are, from what I can see, three main reasons for bigger schools.

 

1 - MONEY. It is cheaper to buy land and construct one building or campus than several small schools on different sites.

 

2 - sports - this is especially true in high school. The more kids you have the more sports programs you can offer and the better the sports teams tend to be.

 

3 - diversity of electives. Most public schools are funded on a per pupil basis. The more students, the more funding available to offer electives like advanced computer science, foreign languages, etc.

 

Many parents WANT the sports teams, clubs, special electives, etc. The bigger school is the price they pay to get those things.

 
November 18, 2006, 4:10 pm CST

11/24 Great School Debate

Quote From: jettav

And I agree that not all parents should be homeshooling and unfortuanetly there  are some educated teachers who cannot teach. it's one thing to be book smart but another to actually be able to do the job, Again, Parents have to do their home work, seek out  what is best for their kids and know that they are doing the right thing. No system is perfect, but the priority has to be on the kids, and I think those cases where the kids are not the high priority, whether they are the parents or the system, are the ones who have kids out of control and the more unsafe atmosphere.

Again, bottom line is it is parents responsibility to give their  kids the best of the best opportunity, especially when it comes to their education and which means kids need tobe ina safe and good living atmosphere and teachers/staff need to be working on the goal of providing the best education possible, unfortunetly there are parents and teachers failing in these areas and of course the kids reap the consequences. Again, i say kudos to all the good parents out there searching the best education for their kids and follwong through as well as the good teachers who put kids first regardless of the system they are in.
It's a catch 22...if a parent shouldn't be teaching, they might know it, so all the research in the world won't help.

Someone might have said something like this before, but being able to mix a sperm and an egg and carry it for 9 months doesn't make someone a smart parent.
 
November 18, 2006, 4:30 pm CST

11/24 Great School Debate

Quote From: purplepenny

It's a catch 22...if a parent shouldn't be teaching, they might know it, so all the research in the world won't help.

Someone might have said something like this before, but being able to mix a sperm and an egg and carry it for 9 months doesn't make someone a smart parent.

I think you missed a "not" in there, but I get your meaning! LOL!

 

I agree with you. I have seen many parents who couldn't read and comprehend simple forms think they should home school...parents who lack basic skills such as constructing a coherent sentence...yet they think they can educate their children. Very few parents think, ' I am really not qualified for this!'

 

I agree that there are too many teachers who are not effective, but at least there are standards for teacher certification. There is a system for weeding out the abysmally unqualified.

 

Too many people look at the home schooling success stories and think it must be an easy path. That simply is not true. You just don't hear about the home schooled kids who are getting a lot of "home" but very little "school." Those kids do not participate in the studies and testing. They often end up back in the school system after a year or two, and then the school gets blamed when the child is so far behind!

 
November 18, 2006, 4:32 pm CST

11/24 Great School Debate

Quote From: princess1

Most homeschool families  do have some type of networking.  In our state you have to be registered  with the state to legally homeschool.  I  just can't understand why people think homeschoolers  are unsocialized.   My  son was far more socially active when I homeshcooled than when he was in public school.   I ask,  what is more of a social learning experience;  sitting in a class with 25 other kids all of the same age group for several hours a day and not being able to  have social interaction with them (that is against the rules, we must be quiet little robots in the classroom)  or being out in the real world interacting with all kinds of people?  The whole "no child left behind " thing is a real joke.  What they have done is lower the standards so the slower learning kids don't get lost.  When I pulled my son out of the public school he was the 10th child to leave the school for homeschooling that week.  His teachers would give him credit on his math just for writing an answer down.  (it did not have to be the correct answer, once he put the answer to 2+2=fish and the teacher marked it correct)  Instead of working with him they told him he was not smart enough to learn math.  In 3 years he finished the entire high school cirriculum, and graduated last May at the age of 16.  He also has been accepted into college.   I will agree that homeschooling is not for everyone, it is only for people who truly care about the education their child recieves.
"I will agree that homeschooling is not for everyone, it is only for people who truly care about the education their child recieves."

Wow..that's a bold statement. I know many people whose kids are in public school and they do care deeply about their educations.
 
November 18, 2006, 4:36 pm CST

11/24 Great School Debate

Quote From: purplepenny

It's a catch 22...if a parent shouldn't be teaching, they might know it, so all the research in the world won't help.

Someone might have said something like this before, but being able to mix a sperm and an egg and carry it for 9 months doesn't make someone a smart parent.
I meant to say, "they might not know it"...sorry.
 
November 18, 2006, 4:58 pm CST

11/24 Great School Debate

I am very interested in watching this show.  From the previews it seems like Dr. Phil chose to only bring the negative side of homeschooling on the show.  I just worry that once everyone sees these 'unschoolers' they will think that ALL homeschoolers are that way.  We are in our fourth year of homeschooling and our children are doing very well academically, physically, mentally, socially.  We make sure they get 'out-and-about' in our community (they are signed up for basketball, soccer, and were in T-ball, Kidz Club, etc.).  Our sons are very well adjusted and a lot of fun to be around.  We get to eat all of our meals together - and I can choose what they eat.  We do have a set curriculum and we suppliment that with educational games, activities, programs, field trips, etc.  We do homeschool (and make the financial sacrifice of being a one-income family) because we want to be with our children and to be a part of their educational learning, not because we want to 'keep them out of the evil public schools.'

 

I understand that homeschooling is not for everyone, and I respect that.  I just hope that others respect our choices as well.  It has worked very well for our family - especially the flexible schedule.  My Dad was in a bad vehicle accident three years ago (in which he became quadraplegic and spent nearly a year in hospitals), we lost my husband's sister to cancer during that time, we moved due to employment, etc., and our homeschool was never interupted because we homeschool - we were able to 'take it with us,' so to speak. 

 
November 18, 2006, 4:58 pm CST

11/24 Great School Debate

Quote From: julie1418

I think you missed a "not" in there, but I get your meaning! LOL!

 

I agree with you. I have seen many parents who couldn't read and comprehend simple forms think they should home school...parents who lack basic skills such as constructing a coherent sentence...yet they think they can educate their children. Very few parents think, ' I am really not qualified for this!'

 

I agree that there are too many teachers who are not effective, but at least there are standards for teacher certification. There is a system for weeding out the abysmally unqualified.

 

Too many people look at the home schooling success stories and think it must be an easy path. That simply is not true. You just don't hear about the home schooled kids who are getting a lot of "home" but very little "school." Those kids do not participate in the studies and testing. They often end up back in the school system after a year or two, and then the school gets blamed when the child is so far behind!

"I think you missed a "not" in there, but I get your meaning! LOL!"

LOL the irony! HAHAHA
 
November 18, 2006, 5:02 pm CST

11/24 Great School Debate

Quote From: purplepenny

"I will agree that homeschooling is not for everyone, it is only for people who truly care about the education their child recieves."

Wow..that's a bold statement. I know many people whose kids are in public school and they do care deeply about their educations.
I think she might have meant that if a parent is gonna homeschool then  they will know that they can do it effectively for they care for thier kids education. I would think that if a parent couldn't do it effectively, they would have enough sense to know that and put them in a system that would be effective for thier child, but I agree that  ther are some who are not gonna get that or even know that they are not being effective.
 
November 18, 2006, 5:08 pm CST

11/24 Great School Debate

Quote From: julie1418

The "bigger" is better philosophy really doesn't stem from best teaching practices. There are, from what I can see, three main reasons for bigger schools.

 

1 - MONEY. It is cheaper to buy land and construct one building or campus than several small schools on different sites.

 

2 - sports - this is especially true in high school. The more kids you have the more sports programs you can offer and the better the sports teams tend to be.

 

3 - diversity of electives. Most public schools are funded on a per pupil basis. The more students, the more funding available to offer electives like advanced computer science, foreign languages, etc.

 

Many parents WANT the sports teams, clubs, special electives, etc. The bigger school is the price they pay to get those things.

yes, I understand  all that and I do believe those things are imporant but yet at the same time, I think a school can be too big. I graduated from a class of  over 500 and I must admit that I was a bit overwhelmed, I did well in school but  I personally am not into big crowds,LOL.  We had a school that was nothing but 9th graders casue the  high school was too big, why they put freshmen in a school of their own is beyond me, but must be working, it has been like that for years. :)

Been waiting on hubby to get his act together to scan some photos but doesn't look like it is gonna happen tonight, he's such a poke. Think I am gonna go buy my own scanner and figure the thing out,LOLLLLLLLL.
 
November 18, 2006, 5:49 pm CST

You are the one who is biased

Quote From: julie1418

 I will agree that homeschooling is not for everyone, it is only for people who truly care about the education their child recieves.

 

So parents who don't home school don't care about the education of their children. Wow!

 

As a former school administrator who has watched countless children revolve in and out of homeschooling, I can tell you that your evidence is purely anecdotal and completely biased. I am sure you know many successful homeschooling families, but that doesn't mean there aren't many unsuccessful homeschooling families. You don't know them because they are not joining your network and keeping active in all the work and commitment it takes to educate a child.

 

I am glad your state has some sort of regulation. My state pretty much lets any parents simply say they are homeschooling, fill out a withdrawal form, and that's that. many parents pull their kids out of public schools because they are tired of the school informing them that children are not behaving or participating in their learning. Then they get them home and realize that their kids will misbehave, not cooperate, and refuse to learn at home too! HUGE surprise!

 

I have a Masters in education, and I have no plans to home school my two children. I take great offense at you insinuating that I don't truly care about my children's education.

While I do not know every family that homeschools (that would be an impossible accomplishment)  I know that statistically homeschoolers do much better both academically and socially.  Your assumption that I said only homeschooling families care about their children shows that even though you may have a higher education you are ignorant.  I did not say that people who don't homeschool don't care about their children's education.  You really have to be a dedicated and caring parent to make and follow through with the commitment to homeschool.  Not all my son's public school time was bad, he had some wonderful caring teachers. (who supported my decision to homeschool)   I am willing to bet you, being an education professional, have seen teachers who don't care and just pass kids along.  I hope you are not that kind of teacher.  Teaching is probably one of the most difficult jobs out there, with little pay and having to deal with children who have parents who refuse to parent  makes the job even harder.  Bottom line, a parent is the child's first teacher, and I believe the most important.
 
First | Prev | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | Next | Last