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Topic : 01/04 "What I Want This Year!"

Number of Replies: 158
New Messages This Week: 0
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Created on : Thursday, December 28, 2006, 05:01:18 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1
Dr. Phil’s guests are going about their New Year’s resolutions the wrong way! They each resolve to change something about their partner. Luca says it’s time his wife, Karen, started losing her baby weight now that two whole months have passed since she gave birth to their son. Karen says she just had her third cesarean section and Luca should cut her some slack! Then, Elena says her husband, Wade, has been holding onto his loud, stinky beast for far too long and 2007 is the year he needs to “send it to the factory.” Wade says he’s just an “old country boy” and there’s no way he’s getting rid of his favorite sidekick. Next, Britney says her sorority sister, Sharnetta, is chronically late everywhere she goes and has even started making Britney late! What is behind her punctuality problem, and will Sharnetta be able to get to the airport in time to be on the show? Plus, tune in for a chocoholic who can’t lick her habit, and a marriage proposal ultimatum. Join the discussion, tell us what you want this year!

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January 9, 2007, 10:36 am CST

talking

Quote From: bear_ta

My Irish DNA makes talking a genetic imperative.
I'm not Irish, but Bipolar Disorder makes me run on at the mouth...or the keyboard...LOL
 
January 9, 2007, 11:00 am CST

Babay weight???

ok. here it goes.. Karen looks beautiful. i would be soo mad if my boyfriend told me to loose baby weight if i looked that good. She looks good for just having a baby. i cant belive this guy.. if i were her i would tell him he better stop with the baby weight remarks or else he is out of here!!!
 
January 9, 2007, 11:11 am CST

Lucky u

Quote From: bear_ta

My Irish DNA makes talking a genetic imperative.
All i got is smart-a** genes in my DNA...
 
January 9, 2007, 11:14 am CST

Lucky u

Quote From: bear_ta

My Irish DNA makes talking a genetic imperative.
All i got is smart-a** genes in my DNA...
 
January 12, 2007, 4:17 pm CST

Quick observations...including the board software

Quote From: mustbecrazy

I had a mammogram in August of 2005 and was told that the lumps in my breasts were fibrocystic lumps.  Six months later, I had a large, painful lump in my left breast.  The new mammogram showed breast cancer.  The lump was 6.5 cm...baseball size...and it went undetected just 6 months sooner...either it was invisible, or it developed very rapidly.  I had a mastectomy in April.

 

Since the cancer was "estrogen receptor positive", meaning that the estrogen in my body was feeding the tumor, I had to have a total hysterectomy and ovary removal.  I have a heart arrhythmia, so I couldn't take the tamixifen that normally would have been given.

 

Besides caffeine, being overweight (which I was) can cause breast lumps and breast cancer because the fat in the body stores estorgen instead of letting it be metabolized.  I have since lost 50 pounds and have about 20 to go toward my goal weight.

 

If you have any suspicious lumps in your breasts that don't show cancer on the mammogram, ask your doctor about doing a breast MRI and ultrasound just to make sure that the lumps are really harmless.  Fibrocystic lumps make it harder to detect breast cancer with self breast exams, if cancer is there.

 

My mom gave me the facts about menstruation and sex as soon as I asked for my first Kotex pads.  That was in the days when we had to wear a belt to hold the pads in place...self-sticking pads were invented a few years later...does that date me, or what??  I was glad to know the facts and the risks of sex, plus the moral side of waiting until marriage to have sex.  No man wants a "used cookie"...a metaphor used by our kids' youth pastors in talking about abstinence before marriage.  Who wants to eat a cookie that has already been licked?

 

Pelvic exams are important with the onset of menstruation.  If your daughters are having particularly painful periods, which I did from day one, the gynecologist can prescribe medications or strategies to help with the pain.  Back in the day, there wasn't much the doctors would do for the pain, and since the doctors were all male, they didnt' really "get it".

 

I am proud to say that my 18 year old son is NOT sexually active, nor is my 13 year old son.  Our 8 year old is being educated on a level that he understands...puberty won't be for a few years yet for him.  Check ups are important for boys too.

 

 

It's too bad the web staff hasn't upgraded the board software to an updated version which permits you to pick & choose what is retained from the message you're replying to.  It would make things far easier to read & deal with.  I know a lot of people start banging and posting without really crafting a message.  Your message is a case of where there's a lot of good material to follow up on.  And it's difficult not being able to intersperse my reply with your post and remove the parts which aren't germane to what I have to say.

 

In terms of finding a 6.5cm lump, that's just over two inches (2.54cm=1inch)!  How could you not find that via self-examination? Even for overweight women who have larger breasts because of fat should be able to find something of that size.

 

As far as the diagnostic tool used, there's something which isn't paraded in the news

 

(I read too much - six newspapers daily, a lot of magazines...the missus wasn't quite prepared twenty years ago for how much and how fast information I can process & store away, and see how to connect the dots.She knows to blame it on my mom. She taught me to read when I was two and continually says it's what inspired her to become a teacher. She said she didn't know what to do or how to do it, so it was letters on blocks, magnetic words on a board, then the newspaper when it arrived every morning.)

 

Back to point.

 

What isn't thown about in the press and should generate a bit more attention is this:  for a lump to show up on a mammogram, it is likely (on average) to have had the core cells at least ten years.  Here in Indiana ("There's more than corn in Indiana" as an amusement park advertises), biomedical things are getting a lot of attention, in the press (not just business magazines or business sections, news.. period), in financial investments, everything. The orthopedic captial of the world is where I grew up (Warsaw): Zimmer, Biomet, Depuy, Othy, and a few others I don't know about as occasionally a crew will get together and start something even more cutting edge; e.g., Biomet, a big company was started by a single employee from Zimmer.

 

Indiana and Purdue University each are focusing heavily on biomedical research. There's a branch of both here in Indianapolis as a single school (IUPUI - Indiana University / Purdue University at Indianapolis) and you can get your degree from either college.  At least four large ethanol plants are in or will be in operation soon.

 

Anyway.  Purdue University is currently working on a blood test which would provide for a woman the same information men can get in a PSA.  They're working with larger samples (a test tube or less) and will scale down as they learn more. A PSA isn't all-definitive, but if something shows up...for me, I'm forty-four, I was cleared by my urologist (a woman - my choice) five years ago to wait until I'm fifty. I was passing a little blood and made an appointment immediately.  She scoped me, didn't find anything. It stopped, then started again. It turned out she'd accidentally nicked me just enough so when the clot slipped off, the blood came back.  That's when she decided to scope everything. Carefully.  It would appear I can sympathize with a close, older relative who, in the process of treatment for prostate cancer discovered bladder cancer, likely saving his life. The prostate treatment, however, had some side effects and he has to catheritize himself every day for a year.  Not something I would enjoy, even though I learned to start an IV on myself (the best way to learn) and had to perform the injection to give blood when the technician was tearing up my arm. After about four tries, I told her to give me the needle or I'd walk. (I'm O+. A near universal donor, which is O-)  They needed the blood, my partner dared me, and they brought a nurse out to watch to make sure I didn't kill myself.  Those were the days as a teen-aged EMT.

 

Finally, but likely very interesting (n.b.): Fat and cancer. I haven't had a chance to read it yet, but take alook at the newest issue of Discover magazine.  It shows a nude, obese man curled up in the corner of a room.  One of the bulleted articles is something like "Fat: there are several types and one is deadly."

 
January 13, 2007, 1:16 am CST

2007

All I want is peace of mind and that the dutch goverment will fall again (soon) that would give me peace of mind. !
 
January 13, 2007, 6:40 pm CST

Dr. Phil's way off this time on a couple of counts

1)As for the truck issue...it's not just a man thing, as other people have said.  I have a purse that has been beyond abused and I love it because I got it with my Gap employee discount and it was on clearance, and it holds everything!  But it's less than attractive now, but do I care?  Nope!  It holds everything!  And it goes with everything, so I see no need to go to the trouble and hassle, not to metnion expense, to change purses.  T-Shirts that are stained beyond recognition, jeans, etc, that no longer fit anymore are not ever going to good-will on similar principles.  We all have things like that that we're attached to for sentimental reasons.

 

2)Regarding Sharnetta...I am late all the time.  Not quite to the degree Sharnetta is, though.  But I am constantly coming in ten minutes late for my first class of the day, or clocking in twenty-minutes late for work. 

 

I think it sounds more like Sharnetta has anxiety-related issues, especially since she has an almost compulsion to check and re-check. 

 

But the thing is, if I'm habitually late on the job or to class, it's because I know that there are no real, immediate consequences to being late.  I'm late because NOBODY REALLY CARES that I'm late or calls me on it.  I'm late because I've been taught that it's acceptable behavior.  Sure, there are going to be some long-term consequences when I look for jobs, but I don't think about that when I hit the snooze button one too many times.  Now if my boss or a teacher chewed me out for being late, then of course I'd make sure I'd arrive on time, but otherwise, if I'm going to be there when I'll be there.

 

It's not because I'm overly egotistical.  If anything, I have low self-esteem issues.  Am I self-centered?   Maybe...but no more than anyone else is.  Honestly, I think that if it were a problem of being self-centered and egotistical, then everyone on the face of the Earth would be chronically late...because let's face it, as much as I wish it weren't, being self-centered and egotistical is a part of human nature.

 

 

 
January 14, 2007, 1:36 pm CST

01/04 "What I Want This Year!"

Quote From: ikwieanders

All I want is peace of mind and that the dutch goverment will fall again (soon) that would give me peace of mind. !
just wondering here but why on  earth would you want the dutch goverment to fall,?.
 
January 15, 2007, 7:37 am CST

palpability of tumor

Quote From: bang70

It's too bad the web staff hasn't upgraded the board software to an updated version which permits you to pick & choose what is retained from the message you're replying to.  It would make things far easier to read & deal with.  I know a lot of people start banging and posting without really crafting a message.  Your message is a case of where there's a lot of good material to follow up on.  And it's difficult not being able to intersperse my reply with your post and remove the parts which aren't germane to what I have to say.

 

In terms of finding a 6.5cm lump, that's just over two inches (2.54cm=1inch)!  How could you not find that via self-examination? Even for overweight women who have larger breasts because of fat should be able to find something of that size.

 

As far as the diagnostic tool used, there's something which isn't paraded in the news

 

(I read too much - six newspapers daily, a lot of magazines...the missus wasn't quite prepared twenty years ago for how much and how fast information I can process & store away, and see how to connect the dots.She knows to blame it on my mom. She taught me to read when I was two and continually says it's what inspired her to become a teacher. She said she didn't know what to do or how to do it, so it was letters on blocks, magnetic words on a board, then the newspaper when it arrived every morning.)

 

Back to point.

 

What isn't thown about in the press and should generate a bit more attention is this:  for a lump to show up on a mammogram, it is likely (on average) to have had the core cells at least ten years.  Here in Indiana ("There's more than corn in Indiana" as an amusement park advertises), biomedical things are getting a lot of attention, in the press (not just business magazines or business sections, news.. period), in financial investments, everything. The orthopedic captial of the world is where I grew up (Warsaw): Zimmer, Biomet, Depuy, Othy, and a few others I don't know about as occasionally a crew will get together and start something even more cutting edge; e.g., Biomet, a big company was started by a single employee from Zimmer.

 

Indiana and Purdue University each are focusing heavily on biomedical research. There's a branch of both here in Indianapolis as a single school (IUPUI - Indiana University / Purdue University at Indianapolis) and you can get your degree from either college.  At least four large ethanol plants are in or will be in operation soon.

 

Anyway.  Purdue University is currently working on a blood test which would provide for a woman the same information men can get in a PSA.  They're working with larger samples (a test tube or less) and will scale down as they learn more. A PSA isn't all-definitive, but if something shows up...for me, I'm forty-four, I was cleared by my urologist (a woman - my choice) five years ago to wait until I'm fifty. I was passing a little blood and made an appointment immediately.  She scoped me, didn't find anything. It stopped, then started again. It turned out she'd accidentally nicked me just enough so when the clot slipped off, the blood came back.  That's when she decided to scope everything. Carefully.  It would appear I can sympathize with a close, older relative who, in the process of treatment for prostate cancer discovered bladder cancer, likely saving his life. The prostate treatment, however, had some side effects and he has to catheritize himself every day for a year.  Not something I would enjoy, even though I learned to start an IV on myself (the best way to learn) and had to perform the injection to give blood when the technician was tearing up my arm. After about four tries, I told her to give me the needle or I'd walk. (I'm O+. A near universal donor, which is O-)  They needed the blood, my partner dared me, and they brought a nurse out to watch to make sure I didn't kill myself.  Those were the days as a teen-aged EMT.

 

Finally, but likely very interesting (n.b.): Fat and cancer. I haven't had a chance to read it yet, but take alook at the newest issue of Discover magazine.  It shows a nude, obese man curled up in the corner of a room.  One of the bulleted articles is something like "Fat: there are several types and one is deadly."

Not only did I not feel the mass until it was that large, but neither did the surgeon in October of 2005, when I had a benign grown removed from the same breast.  He did a complete physical exam of the breast at the time of the surgery. 

 

The way my cancer presented was such an unusual case that it was presented at a breast cancer conference shortly after my mastectomy.  The large cancer was DCIS...Ductal Carcinoma InSitu...meaning that the cancer was contained in the milk ducts.  When the mastectomy was done, it was discovered that I also had infiltrative cancer throughout that breast.

 

It is scary to think that the tumor could get that big before anybody could feel it...I have always been very faithful about doing self exams.  DCIS tumors are soft, and they can go undetected until they are large.

 

Something else that all women who have had breast cancer should know...If you have had breast cancer, you are four times as likely to develop COLON CANCER.  My doctor sent me for a colonoscopy, and the gastroenterologist found pre-cancerous polyps, that would have become full-blown colon cancer, had I waited until the usual age of 50 to have my first colonoscopy.  (I am 45 years old.)

 

So, don't wait on those routine tests, ladies.

 
January 18, 2007, 1:52 pm CST

why?

Quote From: afraid

just wondering here but why on  earth would you want the dutch goverment to fall,?.

they have fallen 3 times already and they did a very poor job ( minister J.P Balkenende looks like a grown up Harry Potter, but that's beside my point). He and his ministry have maid the rich richer and the poor poorer. I don't like the way everything is going here. Social security, health care everything is going down the drain. They made healthcare a marketing business while most off the people would like to see more CARE in marketing ( I hope I didn't make to many spelling mistakes, if so forgive me) I'am a little bit lost in translation.

 

When they fall we would get to vote again, I'am pretty sure the right person for the job would win then. The current people (Goverment) promiss a lot but don't follow through

 
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