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Topic : Trying to Quit Smoking?

Number of Replies: 951
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Created on : Thursday, July 07, 2005, 08:54:00 am
Author : dataimport
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June 28, 2007, 8:04 pm CDT

7th day

Hello,

I was predominately a stress smoker for 23 years.

Over 2 years ago, I cut down from 2 packs a day  to 15 cigarettes a day by only smoking outside, and cut my tar intake by using TarBlock filters.  I was still spending close to $1,200 a year on smokes though.  That's a tenth of my income.  I've been tithing to the church of addiction and asthma. (on such a low income and with pressing medical needs, that's plain stupid, and I keep reminding myself this).

 

I quit 7 days ago.  I am using Zyban and NicodermCQ,  but I am still feeling white knuckled with the craving to smoke.  I use deep breathing, I walk (very late at night when most people are asleep), I do household chores, use hard candies, and suck on straws cut to cigarette size. (That is still such an unflattering look for a lady! (laugh))  When I'm not spaced out with depression or anxiety, I read, sleep, watch tv, and work on crafts.  I sometimes cry with frustration, and  feel like I am mourning the loss of my closest friend.  Cigarettes were always there for me at the worst of times. 

 

I'm 37, and have been on disability for severe depression, anxiety, agoraphobia since 1999.  My reason for quitting is that I need the money to pay for therapy I really need to rehabilitate (that Medicare doesn't pay for).  I had to grimace at this; social security awarded me disability (for which I am extremely thankful and subsequently alive today), and they will pay for pills, (that have failed me as a therapeutic tool after years of testing) but they do not pay for the behavioral therapy that may actually help me improve my life. I fantasize about getting off disability and leading a relatively "normal" life.   To be able to have friends, to be able to travel (to visit my mom I haven't seen in 4 years!), to work and support myself, to have an esteem and sense of self worth.  I thought about all the things I want for myself.   So  rather than cut out necessities, (like food or primary medical care) I had to admit to myself that the largest chunk of my 'expendable' monthly income was put into smoking.  A habit that has been harming me as much as my past has. 

 

Sometimes I wonder if I am setting myself up for failure.   It takes very little for my triggers to get tripped.  And I also know the therapy I need is going to be very stressful if not painful.  I don't want to fail myself, and worse yet,  smoking again would be like having to admit I wasn't serious about wanting to help myself, like telling myself I'm not ready to join the land of the living, that I'd rather sit in my invisible prison of depression, pain and fear.  (add more pressure, rinse, repeat).

 

Maybe I'm being too hard on myself.  I haven't smoked yet, and I'm not smoking right now.  I probably won't smoke tonight.  But the need for familiarity and comfort is so strong. 

 

Thank you for this.  I feel supported in even having a place to write and possibly relate to others. 

 

*hanging in there with a deep clean breath*

 

 

 
June 28, 2007, 8:34 pm CDT

Congrats on your 7th day

Quote From: cala_lilly

Hello,

I was predominately a stress smoker for 23 years.

Over 2 years ago, I cut down from 2 packs a day  to 15 cigarettes a day by only smoking outside, and cut my tar intake by using TarBlock filters.  I was still spending close to $1,200 a year on smokes though.  That's a tenth of my income.  I've been tithing to the church of addiction and asthma. (on such a low income and with pressing medical needs, that's plain stupid, and I keep reminding myself this).

 

I quit 7 days ago.  I am using Zyban and NicodermCQ,  but I am still feeling white knuckled with the craving to smoke.  I use deep breathing, I walk (very late at night when most people are asleep), I do household chores, use hard candies, and suck on straws cut to cigarette size. (That is still such an unflattering look for a lady! (laugh))  When I'm not spaced out with depression or anxiety, I read, sleep, watch tv, and work on crafts.  I sometimes cry with frustration, and  feel like I am mourning the loss of my closest friend.  Cigarettes were always there for me at the worst of times. 

 

I'm 37, and have been on disability for severe depression, anxiety, agoraphobia since 1999.  My reason for quitting is that I need the money to pay for therapy I really need to rehabilitate (that Medicare doesn't pay for).  I had to grimace at this; social security awarded me disability (for which I am extremely thankful and subsequently alive today), and they will pay for pills, (that have failed me as a therapeutic tool after years of testing) but they do not pay for the behavioral therapy that may actually help me improve my life. I fantasize about getting off disability and leading a relatively "normal" life.   To be able to have friends, to be able to travel (to visit my mom I haven't seen in 4 years!), to work and support myself, to have an esteem and sense of self worth.  I thought about all the things I want for myself.   So  rather than cut out necessities, (like food or primary medical care) I had to admit to myself that the largest chunk of my 'expendable' monthly income was put into smoking.  A habit that has been harming me as much as my past has. 

 

Sometimes I wonder if I am setting myself up for failure.   It takes very little for my triggers to get tripped.  And I also know the therapy I need is going to be very stressful if not painful.  I don't want to fail myself, and worse yet,  smoking again would be like having to admit I wasn't serious about wanting to help myself, like telling myself I'm not ready to join the land of the living, that I'd rather sit in my invisible prison of depression, pain and fear.  (add more pressure, rinse, repeat).

 

Maybe I'm being too hard on myself.  I haven't smoked yet, and I'm not smoking right now.  I probably won't smoke tonight.  But the need for familiarity and comfort is so strong. 

 

Thank you for this.  I feel supported in even having a place to write and possibly relate to others. 

 

*hanging in there with a deep clean breath*

 

 

DO ask about grants for the therapy you need, or financial assistance.  i hope you can get exactly what you need.  Good Luck!

 

 
June 29, 2007, 3:56 pm CDT

Trying to Quit Smoking?

Quote From: sunshine80

DO ask about grants for the therapy you need, or financial assistance.  i hope you can get exactly what you need.  Good Luck!

 

  Indeed I have, and do not qualify for state Medicaid or SSI.  I'm not aware of any other grants or financial assistance available to me,  but I am certainly open to suggestions.  The mental health clinic here does thankfully use a sliding scale, but my budget/cost of living on a social security stipend still does not allow enough to pay for therapy even with the discount.  At least, not while I smoke.  Given the choice of smoking or the possibility of a better life, the answer to me is obvious.  (Even if the path to get there is really hard.)

 

It's odd that I see the obviousness of what I must do, but struggle with the threat of failing myself so much.  It's like I tell myself, "If I am serious, there will be no question about it.  Just do it."  That leads to 'living in the land of if".  'What if' a better life is just a fantasy?  'What if' I don't make it this time through therapy, and lose what little I have to a financial debt I wouldn't have the means to pay back?  Failing myself is hard enough.  But failing my obligations to others is too much.

This stress is enormous, and my coping mechanism, that comfort of smoking,  is no longer there.

 

Bah!  I'm too sick to deal with  that thought process.

So, I leave it there.

Thank you very much for your time, suggestion and support!

 

 

 
June 30, 2007, 6:10 am CDT

Trying to Quit Smoking?

Help me help my hubby quit!

 

Hi guys (and gals) - am hoping that I can get some pointers and/or ideas and help on how to help my husband of nearly a year (we're both 44 yrs. old and will be married a year this July - we finally got it right and have what we wish everyone had!) quit smoking.  He's smoked since he was in his early teens (his parents both smoked and continue to do so.)  Also, he has ADD.

 

I've read numerous posts here and am encouraged by the enthusiasm you have for both yourselves and for each other.  It's so neat to read of you who have been successful, but more so to read the struggles that got you there and how you've overcome them.

 

ANYwho.......I went to the one web site someone suggested called whyquit.com   Very informative.  If anyone else has any links that THEY feel have been of some help that would be greatly appreciated.  And I'm not talking about the links from advertisers who just tout their own products........

 

I'd also like to hear from any fellow spouse of a smoker who could share some stories of their own successes.  I think the world of this guy and want to share whatever time we have on this earth with him in a healthy way.  Both MOST importantly, I wish for him to quit for himself, in a non-nagging, helpful and supportive way from me. 

 

Well, take care and keep on trying!

 

Karen

 
June 30, 2007, 7:16 am CDT

Trying to Quit Smoking?

Quote From: cala_lilly

Hello,

I was predominately a stress smoker for 23 years.

Over 2 years ago, I cut down from 2 packs a day  to 15 cigarettes a day by only smoking outside, and cut my tar intake by using TarBlock filters.  I was still spending close to $1,200 a year on smokes though.  That's a tenth of my income.  I've been tithing to the church of addiction and asthma. (on such a low income and with pressing medical needs, that's plain stupid, and I keep reminding myself this).

 

I quit 7 days ago.  I am using Zyban and NicodermCQ,  but I am still feeling white knuckled with the craving to smoke.  I use deep breathing, I walk (very late at night when most people are asleep), I do household chores, use hard candies, and suck on straws cut to cigarette size. (That is still such an unflattering look for a lady! (laugh))  When I'm not spaced out with depression or anxiety, I read, sleep, watch tv, and work on crafts.  I sometimes cry with frustration, and  feel like I am mourning the loss of my closest friend.  Cigarettes were always there for me at the worst of times. 

 

I'm 37, and have been on disability for severe depression, anxiety, agoraphobia since 1999.  My reason for quitting is that I need the money to pay for therapy I really need to rehabilitate (that Medicare doesn't pay for).  I had to grimace at this; social security awarded me disability (for which I am extremely thankful and subsequently alive today), and they will pay for pills, (that have failed me as a therapeutic tool after years of testing) but they do not pay for the behavioral therapy that may actually help me improve my life. I fantasize about getting off disability and leading a relatively "normal" life.   To be able to have friends, to be able to travel (to visit my mom I haven't seen in 4 years!), to work and support myself, to have an esteem and sense of self worth.  I thought about all the things I want for myself.   So  rather than cut out necessities, (like food or primary medical care) I had to admit to myself that the largest chunk of my 'expendable' monthly income was put into smoking.  A habit that has been harming me as much as my past has. 

 

Sometimes I wonder if I am setting myself up for failure.   It takes very little for my triggers to get tripped.  And I also know the therapy I need is going to be very stressful if not painful.  I don't want to fail myself, and worse yet,  smoking again would be like having to admit I wasn't serious about wanting to help myself, like telling myself I'm not ready to join the land of the living, that I'd rather sit in my invisible prison of depression, pain and fear.  (add more pressure, rinse, repeat).

 

Maybe I'm being too hard on myself.  I haven't smoked yet, and I'm not smoking right now.  I probably won't smoke tonight.  But the need for familiarity and comfort is so strong. 

 

Thank you for this.  I feel supported in even having a place to write and possibly relate to others. 

 

*hanging in there with a deep clean breath*

 

 

Hi,

You have the desire and that is half of the process of quitting. As for being on Zyban and the patches, that is a good choice. I have heard so much about "Chantix", that it is a little "miracle pill". I myself  took the Wellbrutrin and used an inhaler to get me over the hard spots. But Chantix seems to be the way to go now, you just have to eat when you take it. Chantix was not out when I was quitting.

I do know what you are feeling about your "friend the cigarette".  I smoked 34 years and tried so many times you wouldn't believe. But with the help of this board and the friendships you make I finally crossed the finish line. I still use this board as a backup to quitting, it gives me strength to keep it under control.

You are going in the right direction, you need smoking aids and a place to come to in a time of need. Continue to post your feelings on quitting, maybe try to incorporate  some type of exercise to take your mind off of it some. And of course the breathing exercises are the best. I call it my "ace in the hole".

Keep me posted I care

 

Linda

 

Two years, two months, four weeks, two days, 14 hours, 14 minutes and 37 seconds. 24647 cigarettes not smoked, saving $4,769.35. Life saved: 12 weeks, 1 day, 13 hours, 55 minutes.

 
July 1, 2007, 9:31 pm CDT

Trying to Quit Smoking?

Quote From: linda12k

Hi,

You have the desire and that is half of the process of quitting. As for being on Zyban and the patches, that is a good choice. I have heard so much about "Chantix", that it is a little "miracle pill". I myself  took the Wellbrutrin and used an inhaler to get me over the hard spots. But Chantix seems to be the way to go now, you just have to eat when you take it. Chantix was not out when I was quitting.

I do know what you are feeling about your "friend the cigarette".  I smoked 34 years and tried so many times you wouldn't believe. But with the help of this board and the friendships you make I finally crossed the finish line. I still use this board as a backup to quitting, it gives me strength to keep it under control.

You are going in the right direction, you need smoking aids and a place to come to in a time of need. Continue to post your feelings on quitting, maybe try to incorporate  some type of exercise to take your mind off of it some. And of course the breathing exercises are the best. I call it my "ace in the hole".

Keep me posted I care

 

Linda

 

Two years, two months, four weeks, two days, 14 hours, 14 minutes and 37 seconds. 24647 cigarettes not smoked, saving $4,769.35. Life saved: 12 weeks, 1 day, 13 hours, 55 minutes.

Hi Linda,

I'm hanging in there, and now at 11 days smoke free.  Earlier, I was driving myself clockwise up a wall,  contemplating a trip to the smoke shop.  Then I realized I didn't have on a patch for a whole 8 hours.  Of course I slapped a patch on my rear,  and didn't get smokes. (laugh) ...but that's progress! Sometimes they make my skin itchy, but figure wearing the patch and being smoke free is an acceptable excuse for a lady to sit around scratching her *ss.  ;D

(Thank goodness no one ever accused me of being a 'lady'!) 

 

Thank you for the encouragement and support!

I appreciate knowing I am not alone.

 

 
July 2, 2007, 3:32 pm CDT

Trying to Quit Smoking?

Quote From: cala_lilly

Hi Linda,

I'm hanging in there, and now at 11 days smoke free.  Earlier, I was driving myself clockwise up a wall,  contemplating a trip to the smoke shop.  Then I realized I didn't have on a patch for a whole 8 hours.  Of course I slapped a patch on my rear,  and didn't get smokes. (laugh) ...but that's progress! Sometimes they make my skin itchy, but figure wearing the patch and being smoke free is an acceptable excuse for a lady to sit around scratching her *ss.  ;D

(Thank goodness no one ever accused me of being a 'lady'!) 

 

Thank you for the encouragement and support!

I appreciate knowing I am not alone.

 

Hi Calli Lilly

Eleven days that is great  !!!!!! Being aware about the patch, saved you. I myself used the nicotine inhaler when times got rough and was on Wellbrutrin to take off the edge. During the times I was craving a cigarette, seemed forever, now the thought comes about as quickly  and goes. You will know when the time comes  to wean yourself, just don't let it be too early. Breathing exercises I still do in a pinch of a craving. You might want to consider adding the stop smoking meter to your computer. www.silkquit.net. It is one of the best little incentives, download it free and use your task bar to see how you are coming along. I wrote another post this morning but we are having some bad weather here and it got lost in space when I tried to post it. Keep posting, let me know how you are coming along, I care.

 

Linda

Two years, three months, one day, 22 hours, 29 minutes and 53 seconds. 24718 cigarettes not smoked, saving $4,782.95. Life saved: 12 weeks, 1 day, 19 hours, 50 minutes.

 
July 9, 2007, 4:27 pm CDT

Karen

Quote From: missusprim

Help me help my hubby quit!

 

Hi guys (and gals) - am hoping that I can get some pointers and/or ideas and help on how to help my husband of nearly a year (we're both 44 yrs. old and will be married a year this July - we finally got it right and have what we wish everyone had!) quit smoking.  He's smoked since he was in his early teens (his parents both smoked and continue to do so.)  Also, he has ADD.

 

I've read numerous posts here and am encouraged by the enthusiasm you have for both yourselves and for each other.  It's so neat to read of you who have been successful, but more so to read the struggles that got you there and how you've overcome them.

 

ANYwho.......I went to the one web site someone suggested called whyquit.com   Very informative.  If anyone else has any links that THEY feel have been of some help that would be greatly appreciated.  And I'm not talking about the links from advertisers who just tout their own products........

 

I'd also like to hear from any fellow spouse of a smoker who could share some stories of their own successes.  I think the world of this guy and want to share whatever time we have on this earth with him in a healthy way.  Both MOST importantly, I wish for him to quit for himself, in a non-nagging, helpful and supportive way from me. 

 

Well, take care and keep on trying!

 

Karen

I haven't been here in a while, but I have been using Chantix to help me quite smoking, I have smoked for nearly 39 years. This drug is new and it makes me throw up a lot if I take a whole tablet, but it works for me. I have br oke down 2 times and bought packs of cigarettes, but it has been 3 weeks since I have had a cigarette. I take a half of a tablet in the morning and sometimes the other half at night. I really did this for myself, my husband never pestered me about smoking, he has never smoked. Good luck on hubby quiting.
 
July 9, 2007, 4:31 pm CDT

Smoking

Quote From: linda12k

Hi,

You have the desire and that is half of the process of quitting. As for being on Zyban and the patches, that is a good choice. I have heard so much about "Chantix", that it is a little "miracle pill". I myself  took the Wellbrutrin and used an inhaler to get me over the hard spots. But Chantix seems to be the way to go now, you just have to eat when you take it. Chantix was not out when I was quitting.

I do know what you are feeling about your "friend the cigarette".  I smoked 34 years and tried so many times you wouldn't believe. But with the help of this board and the friendships you make I finally crossed the finish line. I still use this board as a backup to quitting, it gives me strength to keep it under control.

You are going in the right direction, you need smoking aids and a place to come to in a time of need. Continue to post your feelings on quitting, maybe try to incorporate  some type of exercise to take your mind off of it some. And of course the breathing exercises are the best. I call it my "ace in the hole".

Keep me posted I care

 

Linda

 

Two years, two months, four weeks, two days, 14 hours, 14 minutes and 37 seconds. 24647 cigarettes not smoked, saving $4,769.35. Life saved: 12 weeks, 1 day, 13 hours, 55 minutes.

I do know about the stress smoking, that is (was) what I am, still working on it, I haven't had a smoke in 3 weeks, but I know how hard it is, when I get pissed off at my  Husband, the first thing I think of is a cigarette, and I have to fight with myself not to go buy a pack. So good luck.
 
July 10, 2007, 5:50 am CDT

Hi Angelgirl

Quote From: angelgirl2007

I do know about the stress smoking, that is (was) what I am, still working on it, I haven't had a smoke in 3 weeks, but I know how hard it is, when I get pissed off at my  Husband, the first thing I think of is a cigarette, and I have to fight with myself not to go buy a pack. So good luck.

Hi Angelgirl 2007,

I hear you loud and clear on that one !!!!!! I too still get that feeling of when I'm upset with my hubby, I want one  !!!!! But I will say the craving for one even in the worst time of stress, goes by pretty quickly. I want one, because I know the satisfaction I got from it, but since I have it finally under control is it worth that 5 minute pleasure. That's were the deep breathing exercise comes in. That's my control method. It gives me the that feeling of calm of when I'm really upset. Fighting two battles at once, hubby and the craving !!!!!

 My hubby is on the "Chantix", he dips snuff. The chantix is really helping him. I will say he is in somewhat of denial, takes one or two dips a day, and says "look how much I have cut back" . I try to be understanding, for him to comes to terms in his own battle with it.  He really believes it will never hurt him. He is going on 3 weeks now. I'm buying lots of gum !!!! Keep me posted of how you are coming along.

 

Linda

Two years, three months, one week, two days, 12 hours, 47 minutes and 21 seconds. 24945 cigarettes not smoked, saving $4,827.05. Life saved: 12 weeks, 2 days, 14 hours, 45 minutes.

 
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