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Topic : 12/18 Dangerous Daughters

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Created on : Thursday, December 13, 2007, 05:11:08 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1
Little girls are often the apple of their parents' eye, but what happens when these sweet, innocent daughters grow up to become dangerous young women? Dr. Phil's guests say their daughters are on destructive paths to nowhere. Krista, 22, was a beauty queen who went from wearing a tiara to walking the streets. She will beg, borrow and steal to get money to support her drug habit. She says if she doesn't get help, she will die, but you won't believe what happened after the Dr. Phil cameras left her house! Her mother, Janet, says after two overdoses and four trips to rehab, the family is beginning to lose hope that Krista can be saved. Find out what Dr. Phil tells Krista she must do in order to turn her life around. Then, Beverly and Gil's 26-year-old daughter, Barbara, brutally attacked Gil with a hammer while he slept. Why do they believe Barbara's ex-girlfriend, Corrina, is to blame for the attack? They say Barbara showed no signs of violence before the beating, but did they miss the warnings? Corrina says she has no idea what made Barbara snap, and she wants to clear her name. Barbara's sister and brother weigh in. Why do they also say Corrina is responsible? And, hear what Barbara has to say from behind bars.  Join the discussion.

Find out what happened on the show.

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December 15, 2007, 10:36 am CST

Doctor Phil Show

Dangerous Daugters Doctor Phil. This is new one on me. Your lucky that you have two sons name Jay and

Jordan McGraws. Plus one Daughter in-law name Erica McGraw. See you on Tuesday December 18th,----

2007. Sincerley Yours. Russell Vlaanderen.------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
December 16, 2007, 2:23 am CST

12/18 Dangerous Daughters

I don't understand why people expect "Beauty Queens" to go on to bigger and better things, so to speak.

 

There was some gal here, decades ago, who was Miss Sea or something like that, that also became a drug addict. Later she cleaned up and did posters of her in her crown and mug shot, as a warning.

 

I was young at the time, and thought, "What the heck? -- It''s not like she had a real career or something that went down the tubes because of the dope. Being a beauty queen won't impress everyone."

 
December 16, 2007, 9:54 am CST

12/18 Dangerous Daughters

My daughter is 28 years old and has been in and out of rehab since she was 18.  We thought the last time she fell off the wagon that it would be the last time--that was in 2004.   I have always wanted to write Dr. Phil about this to get help, but never could muster up the strength.  I wish I could send you a picture of her--she is a beautiful girl, blonde hair blue eyes.    She went to parochial school through 8th grade and was in public high school.  Her college tuition was paid for 2 years and she threw all of that out for drugs.   She got out of rehab again in 2004, found a job, got married, and subsequently fell off the wagon. Since I am retired, I told her while she had a chance to get help while she was covered by her husbands insurance to get it.   But she sacrificed all of that and ended up on the streets in June of 2007.   Her husband left her and divorced her and took the dog.   It has been 5 months of torture, but she is finally in a halfway house. It wasn't easy getting her there.   Lots of phone calls.  I got her arrested to get her off the streets and get shelter and food for her.   But once again, she was one up on me and she found some "sugar daddy" to post bond for her and she went back out on the streets.  I then still had to get in debt and hire an attorney to help.   One would ask why I just didn't bring her back home.   The answer to that is that when she lived at home, money became missing out of my checking account.   To bring her back home, I would become a prisoner in my own home, having to lock up everything.   I feel like I would have to take the computers away (yes, she used Myspace to find some of her crummy friends), and I would have to be a taxi cab to take her everywhere because I wouldn't trust her to drive my car. 

 

There is a dread that I have, that she will always fall off the wagon and expect Mom to come running financially to get her well.   I found that my helping her financially was merely enabling her to do more drugs.  Some parents can afford this--unfortunately I am not one of them.  My money has to last me until I'm "6 feet under."   Not knowing if a lifetime of drugs is what she end up with I am supporting her emotionally, and am only jump-starting her at this halfway house.   I have done all of the work for her to get her there, now it is her turn, but I will always be there for her emotionally.  These are your kids and you love them; however, drug addiction is one of a parents worst nightmares.   I do love my daughter Amy so much and I pray for her every day.

 
December 16, 2007, 9:55 am CST

Dangerous Daughters

The show sounds like it will be a good one. I think its sad when anyone gets into drugs. I wish people would wake up and learn drugs are not for fun. Its almost 2008 and we still have young adults and kids, that think its okay and not dangerous to get into drugs, as if they can control the habit. We know its bad, we know you can get addicited, so why do people still do it? Do they just not care about life themselves, or there poor family that have to deal with. I wish Dr Phil was right, and common sense would come back, but I don't think is will. 

 
December 16, 2007, 1:08 pm CST

Dangerous daughters

This is a subject that hits especially close to home.  We have a 19 year old daughter who is on a fast track to the big house.  She refuses to get a job, can't stay in school, and lies as easy as she breathes.  She lives in her granny's basement because she knows gran won't throw her out.  She has been thru counseling, therapy, you name it.  She is a smart young woman who will not take responsibility for herself or her actions.  She married a young GI last year.   She met this man online and knew him for all of 2 days before they eloped.  The famiy did not find out about it until after he left for the war.   I really think she is mentally ill.  I am hoping I can learn something from Dr Phil about how to cope with this mess and not go insane myself.  Thanks for listening.
 
December 16, 2007, 2:37 pm CST

12/18 Dangerous Daughters

Quote From: show_fan1

My daughter is 28 years old and has been in and out of rehab since she was 18.  We thought the last time she fell off the wagon that it would be the last time--that was in 2004.   I have always wanted to write Dr. Phil about this to get help, but never could muster up the strength.  I wish I could send you a picture of her--she is a beautiful girl, blonde hair blue eyes.    She went to parochial school through 8th grade and was in public high school.  Her college tuition was paid for 2 years and she threw all of that out for drugs.   She got out of rehab again in 2004, found a job, got married, and subsequently fell off the wagon. Since I am retired, I told her while she had a chance to get help while she was covered by her husbands insurance to get it.   But she sacrificed all of that and ended up on the streets in June of 2007.   Her husband left her and divorced her and took the dog.   It has been 5 months of torture, but she is finally in a halfway house. It wasn't easy getting her there.   Lots of phone calls.  I got her arrested to get her off the streets and get shelter and food for her.   But once again, she was one up on me and she found some "sugar daddy" to post bond for her and she went back out on the streets.  I then still had to get in debt and hire an attorney to help.   One would ask why I just didn't bring her back home.   The answer to that is that when she lived at home, money became missing out of my checking account.   To bring her back home, I would become a prisoner in my own home, having to lock up everything.   I feel like I would have to take the computers away (yes, she used Myspace to find some of her crummy friends), and I would have to be a taxi cab to take her everywhere because I wouldn't trust her to drive my car. 

 

There is a dread that I have, that she will always fall off the wagon and expect Mom to come running financially to get her well.   I found that my helping her financially was merely enabling her to do more drugs.  Some parents can afford this--unfortunately I am not one of them.  My money has to last me until I'm "6 feet under."   Not knowing if a lifetime of drugs is what she end up with I am supporting her emotionally, and am only jump-starting her at this halfway house.   I have done all of the work for her to get her there, now it is her turn, but I will always be there for her emotionally.  These are your kids and you love them; however, drug addiction is one of a parents worst nightmares.   I do love my daughter Amy so much and I pray for her every day.

Dear Show Fan,

               I can hear all the fear that you have in your message.  I have 2 young boys and I pray that I will be able to guide them as they grow up.  You sound like you have been there for Amy in every way possible.  You must remember that you have your own life to live.  I am sure that you feel that if you do not help her that will be the end.  Drugs have ruined so many lives not only the people that do the drugs but and sometimes more importantly the family and people that love the drug user. Please try to take some of the pressure off of yourself.  I know that it will be hard . You will be there for her when she is ready to stay clean,  I will pray for You and your daughter.

                                                                         Maura  

 
December 17, 2007, 8:58 am CST

Autism

 Looking forward to the show on Wednesday. I have a 9 yr. old autistic son and he can be quite trying at times.  Looking forward to hearing some good adice on parents taking care of ourselves better so we can continue to give the help to our children.
 
December 17, 2007, 4:16 pm CST

I never Promised you a Rose Garden

Quote From: show_fan1

My daughter is 28 years old and has been in and out of rehab since she was 18.  We thought the last time she fell off the wagon that it would be the last time--that was in 2004.   I have always wanted to write Dr. Phil about this to get help, but never could muster up the strength.  I wish I could send you a picture of her--she is a beautiful girl, blonde hair blue eyes.    She went to parochial school through 8th grade and was in public high school.  Her college tuition was paid for 2 years and she threw all of that out for drugs.   She got out of rehab again in 2004, found a job, got married, and subsequently fell off the wagon. Since I am retired, I told her while she had a chance to get help while she was covered by her husbands insurance to get it.   But she sacrificed all of that and ended up on the streets in June of 2007.   Her husband left her and divorced her and took the dog.   It has been 5 months of torture, but she is finally in a halfway house. It wasn't easy getting her there.   Lots of phone calls.  I got her arrested to get her off the streets and get shelter and food for her.   But once again, she was one up on me and she found some "sugar daddy" to post bond for her and she went back out on the streets.  I then still had to get in debt and hire an attorney to help.   One would ask why I just didn't bring her back home.   The answer to that is that when she lived at home, money became missing out of my checking account.   To bring her back home, I would become a prisoner in my own home, having to lock up everything.   I feel like I would have to take the computers away (yes, she used Myspace to find some of her crummy friends), and I would have to be a taxi cab to take her everywhere because I wouldn't trust her to drive my car. 

 

There is a dread that I have, that she will always fall off the wagon and expect Mom to come running financially to get her well.   I found that my helping her financially was merely enabling her to do more drugs.  Some parents can afford this--unfortunately I am not one of them.  My money has to last me until I'm "6 feet under."   Not knowing if a lifetime of drugs is what she end up with I am supporting her emotionally, and am only jump-starting her at this halfway house.   I have done all of the work for her to get her there, now it is her turn, but I will always be there for her emotionally.  These are your kids and you love them; however, drug addiction is one of a parents worst nightmares.   I do love my daughter Amy so much and I pray for her every day.

    . . .  along with the sunshine

          there's gonna be a little rain

          sometimes

 

        Although you may have tried to give her every possible advantage, you must accept that she must make her own way in life.  It is not doing her any good for you to torture yourself, and it has done a major number on you.

      Now be honest, you wrote:  "I would become a prisoner in my own home"  and ""I wouldn't trust her to drive my car."   Those are part of the martyr code of conduct.  In the next paragraph, you admit that you are being played like a sure-fire slot machine.  You pay her off 100% of the time!   "I found that my helping her financially was merely enabling her to do more drugs."

     Surprise!  Surprise!

     I admit that was a bit hard, but I hope you understand I have your best interests at heart.  You are in an awful spot.  You have helped all you can and occasionally more than you should.  Hang in there.  I believe you are going down the right path for you and the rest of your family.  We will all pray for you and your Amy, every day.    

 
December 17, 2007, 4:24 pm CST

Lizzie Borden

   Yes, this kind of thing has happened before.

  And the title character was found Not Guilty because no one would believe that a daughter from a fine family, living in a nice house, could attack and kill her father and stepmother with a hachet.  "40 whacks"

She was too nice. 

    She was that evil. 

 
December 17, 2007, 7:27 pm CST

Looks can be decieveing

You have to watch people a lot now a days. They may look cute but they can be the most dangerous thing around!
 
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