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Topic : 12/18 Dangerous Daughters

Number of Replies: 130
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Created on : Thursday, December 13, 2007, 05:11:08 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1
Little girls are often the apple of their parents' eye, but what happens when these sweet, innocent daughters grow up to become dangerous young women? Dr. Phil's guests say their daughters are on destructive paths to nowhere. Krista, 22, was a beauty queen who went from wearing a tiara to walking the streets. She will beg, borrow and steal to get money to support her drug habit. She says if she doesn't get help, she will die, but you won't believe what happened after the Dr. Phil cameras left her house! Her mother, Janet, says after two overdoses and four trips to rehab, the family is beginning to lose hope that Krista can be saved. Find out what Dr. Phil tells Krista she must do in order to turn her life around. Then, Beverly and Gil's 26-year-old daughter, Barbara, brutally attacked Gil with a hammer while he slept. Why do they believe Barbara's ex-girlfriend, Corrina, is to blame for the attack? They say Barbara showed no signs of violence before the beating, but did they miss the warnings? Corrina says she has no idea what made Barbara snap, and she wants to clear her name. Barbara's sister and brother weigh in. Why do they also say Corrina is responsible? And, hear what Barbara has to say from behind bars.  Join the discussion.

Find out what happened on the show.

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December 26, 2007, 11:38 pm CST

Ending The Blame Game

Quote From: mommajulie

You know, Im sitting here wondering what Janet must be feeling after the Dr. Phil show and reading all the replies on this message board.

She wanted help for her daughter, and what she got was a slew of people questioning her own sobriety and addiction issues. Her best friend even popped in to defend her.

While I admit it is hard to see what is really going on during a 20-30 minute segment of Dr. Phil.......one must ask themselves why so many people see the same thing. Sometimes those who are farthest removed from the emotional turmoil are able to see a little clearer. Sometimes they are able to offer insight into something they have no emotional attachment to.

Janet, if you are reading:

First, I hope your daughter finds the help she needs in order to live a safe, productive and sober life. As hard as this sounds, YOU MUST LET GO AND LET GOD. I can only imagine the pain you are in....watching your beloved daughter get eaten up by addiction. The only way to get out of the pain and turmoil is to focus on yourself and your program with the help of Al-Anon or Nar-Anon.

There, you will find mothers/fathers/brothers/sons....people from every walk of life who deal with issues just like yours.

You cannot let your daughters addiction consume you anymore.

You cannot let her addiction have that kind of control over your life.

The best thing you can do for her is to get healthy yourself. Many viewers expressed concern, that you didnt seem healthy. You can spend time defending that, your friends can spend time defending it.....or you can look that assesment squarely in the eye and ask yourself if there is any merit to it. Im not talking about the "blame-game". Im talking about asking yourself honestly if you have any issues surrounding the things people are talking about.

We are all a work in progress and the minute we stop moving forward and requiring more of ourselves is the minute unhealthy lifestyles and choices creep in.

Blessings to you and your family. You will be in my thoughts and prayers.

 

This person that just wrote you Janet is right.  Dear one, you must stop trying to change that which your daughter feels is the proper way to be in the world.  Only she is able to change herself.  My goodness...all those rehab centers...and still the problem goes on.

 

Perhaps a certified hypnotist could come into the equation and try to piece meal the pieces of this child that sees the need to total self destruct herself before her loved ones eyes...how totally selfish can one be?

 

What will it take for Janet's daughter to awaken?  Janet's passing?

 

Just some thoughts on this gloomy subject.

I will keep you all in my prayers

May You Be Blessed

Love, Light and Peace

Tonie

 

ps. for all persons considering going off of their prescription medications, please, please, please, consult your doctor before jumping off the bridge into the lake...okay?  Lots of these medications are dangerous when you go cold turkey off of them...right Dr. Phil?

 
December 26, 2007, 11:45 pm CST

Epidemic Cases of ADD/ADHD

Quote From: mommajulie

Now this may sound harsh....but how the heck is Janet teaching her daughter endurance without the help of pills...if she's taking pills? We arent talking about tylenol here. We are talking about seriously addictive, mind altering chemicals. Gimmee a break. You cant teach kids to endure the pain life deals us sometimes without pills.....while you are popping pills.

 

Secondly....you might very well be the only family I have ever heard of that ALL of you have add adhd. You, your husband and your kids? Seriously? Im no medical practitioner...but I think I'd be finding myself a new doc if he diagnosed my entire family with add/adhd. I did my thesis on alternatives to medication for kids diagnosed with ADD/ADHD....and in all my research have never ever come across an entire family with it. Very strange indeed.

 

And third...you seem to be doing an awful lot of protesting on Janets behalf. Maybe if you backed off just a little bit, she'd be able to see what it is that others are seeing and trying to share. That she doesnt seem healthy. Something doesnt seem right. YES, something is skewed. But I dont think its peoples opinion that something is off kilter and needs to be looked at and adressed with Janets behaviour.

Hmmmm....what is it they say about people who protest the loudest?

 

And third....

I would like to see the factual stats of how much of our population since 9/11...have started to show itself with ADD/ADHD's rise in case counts.

 

I believe we would all find it quite interesting...

 

Perhaps what we would find is that lots more of the population are suffering post traumatic stress disorder and those that know how to handle it with diet, exercise and nutritional supplemental, will help others locked into the prescription pad world...the way back to balance...

 

Simply due to the fact that antidepressants treat the symptom, and not the real problem.  Plus the side effects are sometimes what gets the person on them...more headaches than the actual problem...of low seratonin levels.

 

Just my thoughts...

May You Be Blessed

Tonie

 
December 27, 2007, 12:13 am CST

There is no cure for addiction

Quote From: mommajulie

I think there is a reason so many people seem to be coming down hard on the mother.

First of all, just because a doctor prescribes a medication, does not mean the person isnt abusing it.

Secondly.....what are we teaching others, most importantly our kids, when our fix to life stress is popping a pill?

I have no experience with clonapin....but adderal is an extremely addictive drug, that does produce a "high".

You are fooling yourself if you think kids dont watch and emulate how parents deal with stress.

 

Because I had children with an addict, Ive had to be extra extra cautious about how I teach my kids about medication and alternatives.

We live in a culture that has a pill for everything. Cant sleep? Take a pill. Feeling blue? Take a pill. Your kid seems wired? Give them a pill. I know parents who rush themselves and their kids to the doc at the first sign of ANYTHING in the hopes that a little pill will fix it.

Rarely do we hear about alternatives to medication. How many of us offer a cold cloth for a head-ache FIRST, instead of tylenol? A massage instead of a muscle relaxant?

It is the very idea that we feed to out kids, that a pill/medication will fix everything.

Just google some statistics on how many kids are on ADD/ADHD drugs now. How easy they are to get a prescription for.

Putting a mood-altering addictive substance into your body, or the body of your child is not a decision to be taken lightly. Its sets you up for dealing with addiction issues for a lifetime.

There is no cure for addiction.

 

Your posting is so on target.

 

You are right in so many directions and degrees...

 

Moms are the role models for their daughters.

Moms are the images of what a woman looks and acts like that sons will try to find to marry or settle with.

 

Fathers are the role models for their sons,

and on the same token, fathers are the images of what a male looks and acts like that daughters will seek out to marry or settle with...

 

Yet, it wasn't two or three years ago that I heard an advertisement on our local radio station about a major university research program that asked for research subjects between the ages of 9-17 years old that were having a problem with depression and were willing to take test medications.

 

Now I had never heard of this type of advertisement for children...and I wondered then...wow the problem must really be a getting larger for the children age group, or this type of research program would not have been a going on.

 

So could our children be merely absorbing the energy of their parents...for we do become the energy of others that surround our energy fields.

 

Take myself for instance, I can't be around depressive people for long without getting depressed myself...

 

Just some more thoughts to throw out in the mix...

 

I remember the time that I was a youth correctional officer and I came across the 5 year survey that the State of California put together about the criteria of delinquent kids.

 

I don't remember now what the whole survey entailed...the largest piece of the puzzle was the experiment that was done on the subject of self esteem raising.

 

What the research group did was send the school teachers of this one high school to self esteem raising classes...it was largely noted almost immediately that the self esteem of the students automatically raised just from the teachers having taken the classes...now I find that interesting....don't you?

 

Good stuff

God Bless You

Tonie

 
December 27, 2007, 12:27 am CST

Drug Addiction, Doctor Prescribed

Quote From: kkelso

To see your show with the model with the drug addiction, boy you hit the nail on the head. My daughter has been involved with modeling for several years, she is now almost 21. We just found out last week that she has had problems with drugs for many years, including during high school and recently. I will try to make it short. We found out she did cocaine during high school from 10-12 grade. She got away from it for awhile and started again just after. She finally got away from it but also was drinking which intensified the problem. She meet someone and was on her way to a better life. Screeech, she was in a bad accident where a crazy driver ran her off the road and totaled her car, knocked her unconciance and ended up in the hospital. After the accident she ended up in pain and was getting help from her doctor until he wouldn't renew pain meds. So she found someone with Oxicontin and so over the next three months she depleated her bank account buying them. She tried to quit on her own and last week we finally got it out of her what has been goin on. Two days after we found out all of the above, she was arrested with possesion of methadone, which she said she had to help her kick the Oxicontin. I can't believe anything she says to me and I love her so much I want to help however I don't know how. I'm scared, confused and don't know where to go next. Now we have criminal and life threatening issues to overcome.

I too believe that doctors start many patients on the path of addiction problems...I have seen quite a few such cases myself in my practice.

 

It really is sad...

 

They get them addicted and to help them get off their addictive path, they withdraw the meds from them...and force them into the streets and medicine cabinets of loved ones or strangers...or doctors unaware that they are being set up for drug addicts...to gain access of prescriptions.

Love, Light and Peace

Tonie

 
December 27, 2007, 12:35 am CST

Beauty only skin deep

Quote From: marianparoo

I don't understand why people expect "Beauty Queens" to go on to bigger and better things, so to speak.

 

There was some gal here, decades ago, who was Miss Sea or something like that, that also became a drug addict. Later she cleaned up and did posters of her in her crown and mug shot, as a warning.

 

I was young at the time, and thought, "What the heck? -- It''s not like she had a real career or something that went down the tubes because of the dope. Being a beauty queen won't impress everyone."

Unfortunately...I don't believe this child really believed herself so beautiful or she wouldn't have the promptings to destroy herself...

 

Or perhaps she did and later found out that outer beauty couldn't stop the hurt that came from being so beautiful...being popular, does have it pit falls as well,

 

For one is more pursued than others and thus with so many choices that they can make, sometimes they  make the wrong choice  So.perhaps this is what we are a really seeing here, a beauty queen over the edge of reality.

 

Just my thoughts again

Love, Light and Peace

Tonie

 
December 31, 2007, 9:13 am CST

12/18 Dangerous Daughters

Quote From: shmigelz

How can someone who's only 22 years old, been to Detox not once, twice or three times, BUT FOUR TIMES ALREADY! and still?? It's like after each time she's somehow managed to get deeper, and deeper into a rut.. and now she's in sooooooooo deep she can't get out...

 

At that point I don't care how attractive or good looking you think you are or appear to be to others. You look nothing but an absolute ass to everyone watching and IF anything I feel bad for your family and others who are related to you and have had to put up with this time bomb ready to go off...

 

I know Dr.Phil was fairly direct and hard on her but I think he could of even been MORE strict, to the point, and say it as it is more then he did... BUT I do give Dr.Phil alot of credit on today's show because, YES I am a huge fan and supporter of Dr.Phil even though I live in Canada, but he stook to his guns!

 

I don't care if this girl, Krista is a 'beauty queen' or whatever.. I dont care if she was 'America's Next Top Model' or the next 'President of the  United States.' BUT the buck stops HERE! so I predict its now or never with this one....

 

It's gonna be sooooooooooooo hard for her. She's gonna have to be COMPLETELY OFF the MAP for a LONG time, no drugs, no highs, no escapes, no drug jerk boyfriends, no outlets, no money, no NOTHING! just alot of rehab, suffering, mental and physical and thats just the tip of the iceberg....... WOW!

 

I guess if this fails her mom can just handcuff her to the bathroom toilet for the next 6 months......

 I wonder if Krista's been kicked out of LaHacienda yet. The staff was warned about the crap she'd pull on the male clients there. And, according to an update, at the end of the show, she'd committed many infractions. And, was in danger of being kicked out.
 
January 1, 2008, 2:35 am CST

You dropped the ball on this show

Dear Dr. Phil,

I think you dropped the ball on your December 18, 2007 show of the daughter who tried to murder her father in his sleep by bashing his head in with a hammer. The most obvious and common source of that kind of rage is childhood sexual abuse (CSA) - which, incidentally, is the single greatest indicator for incarceration for a violent crime. Although the subject was brought up briefly, you steered the conversation completely away from this and even offered other explanations about what was going on – depression, stress, alcoholism – all of which are common symptoms of CSA. You pride yourself on asking the tough questions and being honest, and yet you deftly avoided the real smoking gun in this family.

You thereby missed a perfect opportunity to shed light on a topic that is so pervasive in our country and yet is so unacknowledged. “Sexual abuse of children is a harsh fact of life in our society. It is more common than most people realize. Some surveys say at least 1 out of 5 adult women and 1 out of 10 adult men report having been sexually abused in childhood.”
(http://www.medem.com/MedLB/article_detaillb.cfm?article_ID=ZZZ1LW3YA7C&sub_cat=348 )

People seem afraid to even talk about CSA, and even more disturbing is the fact that there are so few professionals who know how to treat patients who have been abused. Despite this, more and more adults are speaking out about their own histories of abuse.

In any event, I think you should have a show about CSA and how it impacts people’s lives in the most profound ways imaginable. To this end, I have a friend you might want to consult and/or interview. She is Julie Motz whom you may know of because of her book, Hands of Life, and her pioneering work of non-traditional healing in the operating room. Observing the levels of CSA in heart transplant and breast cancer patients, she decided to make it the focus of her life’s work. She lectures and teaches workshops nationally on subjects ranging from sexual wounding to depression, eating disorders and inter-generational healing. But whatever the subject, she has told me, sexual abuse comes up over and over again as a pressing and pervasive issue.

Here are just a few of some of the more disturbing statistics of CSA:
It is estimated that there are 60 million survivors of childhood sexual abuse in America today.
Source: Forward, 1993.

Approximately 31% of women in prison state that they had been abused as children.
Source: United States Department of Justice, 1991.

Approximately 95% of teenage prostitutes have been sexually abused.
Source: CCPCA, 1992.

It is estimated that children with disabilities are 4 to 10 times more vulnerable to sexual abuse than their non-disabled peers.
Source: National Resource Center on Child Sexual Abuse, 1992.

Long term effects of child abuse include fear, anxiety, depression, anger, hostility, inappropriate sexual behavior, poor self esteem, tendency toward substance abuse and difficulty with close relationships.
Source: Browne & Finkelhor, 1986.

Clinical findings of adult victims of sexual abuse include problems in interpersonal relationships associated with an underlying mistrust. Generally, adult victims of incest have a severely strained relationship with their parents that is marked by feelings of mistrust, fear, ambivalence, hatred, and betrayal. These feelings may extend to all family members.
Source: Tsai and Wagner, 1978.

Young girls who are forced to have sex are three times more likely to develop psychiatric disorders or abuse alcohol and drugs in adulthood, than girls who are not sexually abused. Sexual abuse was also more strongly linked with substance abuse than with psychiatric disorders. It was also suggested that sexual abuse may lead some girls to become sexually active at an earlier age and seek out older boyfriends who might, in turn, introduce them to drugs. Psychiatric disorders were from 2.6 to 3.3 times more common among women whose CSA included intercourse, and the risk of substance abuse was increased more than fourfold, according to the results. Family factors -- parental education, parenting behavior, family financial status, church attendance -- had little impact on the prevalence of psychiatric or substance abuse disorders among these women, the investigators observe. Similarly, parental psychopathology did not predict the association between CSA and later psychopathology.
Source: Kenneth S. Kendler, M.D., et al, Medical College of Virginia Commonwealth University, Archives of General Psychiatry 2000;57:953-959.
Also see review at Medscape

Among both adolescent girls and boys, a history of sexual or physical abuse appears to increase the risk of disordered eating behaviors, such as self-induced vomiting or use of laxatives to avoid gaining weight. Among those at increased risk for disordered eating were respondents who had experienced sexual or physical abuse and those who gave low ratings to family communication, parental caring and parental expectations. In light of these findings, the researchers conclude that "strong familial relationships may decrease the risk for disordered eating among youth reporting abuse experiences."
Source: Dr. Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, et al, University of Minneapolis, International Journal of Eating Disorders 2000;28:249-258.

Young girls who are sexually abused are more likely to develop eating disorders as adolescents. The findings also add to a growing body of research suggesting that trauma in childhood increases the risk of developing an eating disorder. Abused girls were more dissatisfied with their weight and more likely to diet and purge their food by vomiting or using laxatives and diuretics. Abused girls were also more likely to restrict their eating when they were bored or emotionally upset. Wonderlich suggests that abused girls might experience higher levels of emotional distress, possibly linked to their abuse, and have trouble coping. Food restriction and perhaps other eating disorder behaviors may (reflect) efforts to cope with such experiences. The report also indicates that while girls who were abused were less likely to exhibit perfectionist tendencies (such as making extreme efforts to avoid disappointing others and a need to be 'the best'), they tended to want thinner bodies than girls who had not been abused.
Source: Stephen A. Wonderlich, M.D., et al, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Fargo, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 2000;391277-1283.

Sincerely,

Sarah J. Link


 
January 5, 2008, 7:46 pm CST

people don't know this family

Quote From: rashal

Dear Dr. Phil,

I think you dropped the ball on your December 18, 2007 show of the daughter who tried to murder her father in his sleep by bashing his head in with a hammer. The most obvious and common source of that kind of rage is childhood sexual abuse (CSA) - which, incidentally, is the single greatest indicator for incarceration for a violent crime. Although the subject was brought up briefly, you steered the conversation completely away from this and even offered other explanations about what was going on depression, stress, alcoholism all of which are common symptoms of CSA. You pride yourself on asking the tough questions and being honest, and yet you deftly avoided the real smoking gun in this family.

You thereby missed a perfect opportunity to shed light on a topic that is so pervasive in our country and yet is so unacknowledged. Sexual abuse of children is a harsh fact of life in our society. It is more common than most people realize. Some surveys say at least 1 out of 5 adult women and 1 out of 10 adult men report having been sexually abused in childhood.
(http://www.medem.com/MedLB/article_detaillb.cfm?article_ID=ZZZ1LW3YA7C&sub_cat=348 )

People seem afraid to even talk about CSA, and even more disturbing is the fact that there are so few professionals who know how to treat patients who have been abused. Despite this, more and more adults are speaking out about their own histories of abuse.

In any event, I think you should have a show about CSA and how it impacts peoples lives in the most profound ways imaginable. To this end, I have a friend you might want to consult and/or interview. She is Julie Motz whom you may know of because of her book, Hands of Life, and her pioneering work of non-traditional healing in the operating room. Observing the levels of CSA in heart transplant and breast cancer patients, she decided to make it the focus of her lifes work. She lectures and teaches workshops nationally on subjects ranging from sexual wounding to depression, eating disorders and inter-generational healing. But whatever the subject, she has told me, sexual abuse comes up over and over again as a pressing and pervasive issue.

Here are just a few of some of the more disturbing statistics of CSA:
It is estimated that there are 60 million survivors of childhood sexual abuse in America today.
Source: Forward, 1993.

Approximately 31% of women in prison state that they had been abused as children.
Source: United States Department of Justice, 1991.

Approximately 95% of teenage prostitutes have been sexually abused.
Source: CCPCA, 1992.

It is estimated that children with disabilities are 4 to 10 times more vulnerable to sexual abuse than their non-disabled peers.
Source: National Resource Center on Child Sexual Abuse, 1992.

Long term effects of child abuse include fear, anxiety, depression, anger, hostility, inappropriate sexual behavior, poor self esteem, tendency toward substance abuse and difficulty with close relationships.
Source: Browne & Finkelhor, 1986.

Clinical findings of adult victims of sexual abuse include problems in interpersonal relationships associated with an underlying mistrust. Generally, adult victims of incest have a severely strained relationship with their parents that is marked by feelings of mistrust, fear, ambivalence, hatred, and betrayal. These feelings may extend to all family members.
Source: Tsai and Wagner, 1978.

Young girls who are forced to have sex are three times more likely to develop psychiatric disorders or abuse alcohol and drugs in adulthood, than girls who are not sexually abused. Sexual abuse was also more strongly linked with substance abuse than with psychiatric disorders. It was also suggested that sexual abuse may lead some girls to become sexually active at an earlier age and seek out older boyfriends who might, in turn, introduce them to drugs. Psychiatric disorders were from 2.6 to 3.3 times more common among women whose CSA included intercourse, and the risk of substance abuse was increased more than fourfold, according to the results. Family factors -- parental education, parenting behavior, family financial status, church attendance -- had little impact on the prevalence of psychiatric or substance abuse disorders among these women, the investigators observe. Similarly, parental psychopathology did not predict the association between CSA and later psychopathology.
Source: Kenneth S. Kendler, M.D., et al, Medical College of Virginia Commonwealth University, Archives of General Psychiatry 2000;57:953-959.
Also see review at Medscape

Among both adolescent girls and boys, a history of sexual or physical abuse appears to increase the risk of disordered eating behaviors, such as self-induced vomiting or use of laxatives to avoid gaining weight. Among those at increased risk for disordered eating were respondents who had experienced sexual or physical abuse and those who gave low ratings to family communication, parental caring and parental expectations. In light of these findings, the researchers conclude that "strong familial relationships may decrease the risk for disordered eating among youth reporting abuse experiences."
Source: Dr. Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, et al, University of Minneapolis, International Journal of Eating Disorders 2000;28:249-258.

Young girls who are sexually abused are more likely to develop eating disorders as adolescents. The findings also add to a growing body of research suggesting that trauma in childhood increases the risk of developing an eating disorder. Abused girls were more dissatisfied with their weight and more likely to diet and purge their food by vomiting or using laxatives and diuretics. Abused girls were also more likely to restrict their eating when they were bored or emotionally upset. Wonderlich suggests that abused girls might experience higher levels of emotional distress, possibly linked to their abuse, and have trouble coping. Food restriction and perhaps other eating disorder behaviors may (reflect) efforts to cope with such experiences. The report also indicates that while girls who were abused were less likely to exhibit perfectionist tendencies (such as making extreme efforts to avoid disappointing others and a need to be 'the best'), they tended to want thinner bodies than girls who had not been abused.
Source: Stephen A. Wonderlich, M.D., et al, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Fargo, Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry 2000;391277-1283.

Sincerely,

Sarah J. Link


please don't be so quick to judge this family....you don't know them.  They have 6 kids of their own and at one yime had 8 foster children as well.  He is a respected police officer in our community and [f his daughter was abused it most certainly was not by him!
 
April 6, 2008, 6:54 am CDT

CREULTY - MANIPULATIONS - HATRED- RAGE- REVENGE

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a psychological disorder characterized by pervasive instability in self-image, behavior, moods, and interpersonal relationships.  This instability often disrupts family and work life, long-term planning, and the individual's sense of self-identity. 

 

While less known than schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness), BPD is more common, affecting 2% of adults (1-33), mostly females.  Some of my favorite books that provide a great introduction and insight are:

 

 

Emotional Blackmail:  When the People in Your Life Use Fear, Obligation and Guilt to Manipulate You by Susan Forward AND Why is it Always About You?  The Seven Deadly Sins of Narcissism by Sandy Hotchkiss

 

Get Me Out of Here:  My Recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder by Rachel Reiland OR Girl Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen OR Stop Walking on Eggshells:  Taking Your Life Back...by Paul Mason and Randi Kreger

 

Understanding the Borderline (Parent) Mother:  Helping Her Children Transcend the Intense, Unpredictable and Volatile Relationship by Christine Ann Lawson OR Surviving a Borderline Parent:  How to Heal Your Childhood Wounds & Build Trust, Boundaries and Self-Esteem by Kimberlee Roth and Freda Friedman OR The Angry Heart:  Overcoming Borderline and Addictive Disorders by Joseph Santoro and Ronald Cohen OR Overcoming Passive-Aggression:  How to Stop Hidden Anger from Spoiling Your Relationships...by Tim Murphy and Loriann Oberlin

 

High Conflict People in Legal Disputes by Bill Eddy OR Divorce Poison:  Protecting the Parent-Child Bond from a Vindictive (Relative) Ex by Richard Warshak  

 

How to Journal for Therapy:

http://arar.essortment.com/therapyjournali_repu.htm 

 

Healing Anxiety and Depression (7 types of anxiety and depression) by Daniel Amen and Lisa Routh OR Getting Help:  The Complete and Authoritative Guide to Self-Assessment and Treatment of Mental Health Problems by Jeffrey Wood

 

 

Some of the story is typical:  feelings of insecurity contributing to destructive behaviors such as promiscuity, manipulations, self-abuse, rage attacks, revenge, addictions, and eating disorders.  The extreme behaviors of BPD constitute the high drama in the stories of those who endure its ravages.

 

Hope it helps!

 

 
April 11, 2008, 10:49 am CDT

hi

Quote From: anon_slc

Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a psychological disorder characterized by pervasive instability in self-image, behavior, moods, and interpersonal relationships.  This instability often disrupts family and work life, long-term planning, and the individual's sense of self-identity. 

 

While less known than schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness), BPD is more common, affecting 2% of adults (1-33), mostly females.  Some of my favorite books that provide a great introduction and insight are:

 

 

Emotional Blackmail:  When the People in Your Life Use Fear, Obligation and Guilt to Manipulate You by Susan Forward AND Why is it Always About You?  The Seven Deadly Sins of Narcissism by Sandy Hotchkiss

 

Get Me Out of Here:  My Recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder by Rachel Reiland OR Girl Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen OR Stop Walking on Eggshells:  Taking Your Life Back...by Paul Mason and Randi Kreger

 

Understanding the Borderline (Parent) Mother:  Helping Her Children Transcend the Intense, Unpredictable and Volatile Relationship by Christine Ann Lawson OR Surviving a Borderline Parent:  How to Heal Your Childhood Wounds & Build Trust, Boundaries and Self-Esteem by Kimberlee Roth and Freda Friedman OR The Angry Heart:  Overcoming Borderline and Addictive Disorders by Joseph Santoro and Ronald Cohen OR Overcoming Passive-Aggression:  How to Stop Hidden Anger from Spoiling Your Relationships...by Tim Murphy and Loriann Oberlin

 

High Conflict People in Legal Disputes by Bill Eddy OR Divorce Poison:  Protecting the Parent-Child Bond from a Vindictive (Relative) Ex by Richard Warshak  

 

How to Journal for Therapy:

http://arar.essortment.com/therapyjournali_repu.htm 

 

Healing Anxiety and Depression (7 types of anxiety and depression) by Daniel Amen and Lisa Routh OR Getting Help:  The Complete and Authoritative Guide to Self-Assessment and Treatment of Mental Health Problems by Jeffrey Wood

 

 

Some of the story is typical:  feelings of insecurity contributing to destructive behaviors such as promiscuity, manipulations, self-abuse, rage attacks, revenge, addictions, and eating disorders.  The extreme behaviors of BPD constitute the high drama in the stories of those who endure its ravages.

 

Hope it helps!

 

 I think you hit the nail on the head.  I have been floating around here on message boards trying to figure out if any episodes have been done on BPD.  There are too many people out there who suffer from this, including myself, that have been missed diagnosed for years.  There are a lot of young women out there leading very distructive lives because of this and still no mention of it?  I do not get it.  Let me know if you come up with a show concerning this.  There are litterally people, young women mostly, dying out there and it leading to she was "just depressed".  It is so much bigger than that.  Let me know!!
 
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