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Topic : 03/05 Identity Theft, Part 2

Number of Replies: 60
New Messages This Week: 0
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Created on : Friday, February 29, 2008, 01:18:06 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1
Each year, millions of Americans have their identities stolen, but what happens when your own flesh and blood rips you off? John and Tom haven’t seen or spoken to each other in five years because John says his brother used his name when he was stopped for a traffic violation. John wants his sibling to confess to his crime, but is Tom willing to come clean? Find out why their sister, Joanne, says Tom’s problems run a lot deeper than he admits. Then, Mattie has been recovering from the financial devastation of identity theft for over 16 years, and she says the culprit is none other than her mom!  When Mattie was 6, she says her mother opened multiple accounts in her name. Then she racked up so much debt, Mattie says she had to file for bankruptcy at 21! Mattie’s grandmother, Barbara, says that although she knew about the fraud, she just couldn’t bring herself to call the police on her own daughter. Now Mattie is 23 and says she recently had to file charges against her mom because she's still receiving bills that don't belong to her. How can Mattie protect herself from future fraud, and how does she heal the pain she says her mom caused by stealing her identity? Share your thoughts, join the discussion.

Find out what happened on the show.

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March 1, 2008, 7:04 am CST

Scary....

 

It's scary when you think someone has your SSN and Birth date.  I went online to check my student loan information, but there was a different address in the profile.  It freaked me out!  I called the company and they told me the date it was changed (luckily it was from a time when I contacted them to send me info, and they messed up) so I changed it. 

 

Just to be sure, I got on the Experian site and viewed my credit report (which they say you should do about once a year (you get a free one once a year)).  Also, it's a good idea to print it out (because looking at it decreases your score), and if anything looks wrong,you can contest it.  There was NOTHING out of the ordinary, but to be careful, I put a ID theft alert  on it (it only lasts so long, but it's worth it).   Nothing happened, but being proactive about it can save your credit. 

 

Here is Experian's site on Fraud Prevention and how to report it:

 

http://www.experian.com/identity_fraud/fraud_prevention.html

 

Here's the Federal Trade Commission's site on Preventing ID Theft:

 

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/idtheft/

 

Check it out!

 
March 1, 2008, 9:39 am CST

CREDIT REPORT BUREAUS

Do NOT flag them!  It will be a pain to apply for credit, and it will take MONTHS to unblock yours or straighten it out.
 
March 1, 2008, 9:54 am CST

Doctor Phil Show

Doctor Indentity Part Phil Theft Two. What happen on Indentity One Part Theft? I donot remember that one--

at all. See you on Wednesday March 05th, 2008. Sincerley Your Russell Vlaannderen.----------------------------

 
March 1, 2008, 10:33 am CST

DAUGHTER AND ADOPTED MOTHER

ADOPTED MOTHER IS  IN A  NURSING HOME AND DAUGHTER APPLIED  FOR SEVERAL CREDIT  CARDS   UNDER  THE  MOM'S   NAME  AND   ALSO HAD  COMPANY ISSUE  CARDS  IN HER  NAME  ( DAUGHTERS )  AS WELL   , AND NOW  ARE  USING THEM AS HER OWN .  DAUGHTER IS  SOLE  HEIR  AND  SAYS ITS  HER  MONEY  AND  CAN USE  WHAT SHE  WANTS , WHEN   SHE NEEDS TO .

 

ACTUALLY  THE DAUGHTER WANTS TO REMOVE HER  MOM (  ALZHIMERS  PATIENT )    AND  HAVE  HER  DISCHARGED  FROM   NH     SIMPLY  SO  SHE DOES NOT HAV E TO LOSE  HER   SS  CHECK ....  

 
March 1, 2008, 11:55 am CST

That's the point....

Quote From: cmolinger

Do NOT flag them!  It will be a pain to apply for credit, and it will take MONTHS to unblock yours or straighten it out.

 

As long as you don't have to apply for a credit card, home or auto loans, and you know EXACTLY how long the period of blocking is, it can protect you.  I don't plan on doing any of that, though.  I don't know if enough of my info (or any) was sent to the wrong address, and it might have been enough to start a fraudulent account, for example. 

 

You can still use the credit cards you have now, still use the loans you have at present. But it's just a temporary thing, and I'd rather have a pain in the butt, a hold on applying for loans/credit cards than have someone access to my info and apply for multiple loans and screw up my credit.

 
March 1, 2008, 12:20 pm CST

Also....

Quote From: cmolinger

Do NOT flag them!  It will be a pain to apply for credit, and it will take MONTHS to unblock yours or straighten it out.

 

Also, if you just HAVE to have the "flag" or alert lifted, all you have to do is write a letter to the credit bureau, or just wait for it to expire.

 
March 1, 2008, 1:20 pm CST

Identity Theft

Identity Theft.

We’ve all heard about this, how many really take precautions.

When you go to the Dentist and they ask you for your Social Security Number, Drivers License, Date of Birth, etc. most folks dish out this information. They have no idea who in that office will see this information or what computer protections are utilized in the practice. Same problem at Doctor Offices, Work Place events, etc, even when looking for furniture, a home, when will folks stop giving out information? Recently I purchased a used car, paying cash, they wanted all of this information, I emphatically said no. I got the car they go no information. We are our own worst enemies. We give out personal habits, household information, etc to strangers on the telephone. Do you have a secure line? I don’t care if it’s the credit card company, you’re bank, you’re work, etc. DO NOT give out personal information. Set up code words for identity purposes such as your favorite pet’s name, etc. That’s all for the moment.

 
March 1, 2008, 8:24 pm CST

HOW TO FIGHT BACK - REPORT IDENTITY THEFT/MISC FRAUD

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is very committed to investigating internet, telephone, mail fraud and identity theft.  The FTC works for the consumer to prevent fraudulent, deceptive and unfair business practices in the marketplace and to provide information to help consumers report, spot, stop, and avoid them.

 

Education is a key tool to prevent consumer injury.  The following link to the FTC website, you'll find publications with advice on avoiding scams and rip-offs, as well as tips on other consumer topics and reporting consumer fraud and identity theft.

 

www.ftc.gov/bcp/consumer.shtm

 

To file a complaint or to get free information on consumer issues, visit www.ftc.gov or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261.

 

The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure, online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the U.S. and abroad.

 

Hope it helps!

 

 
March 3, 2008, 10:27 am CST

Oh, yes.

Oh, yes. Identity theft. We have all heard about it! Like many people, I was actually a victim of it. First off, there was this bill that was $931.68 long (It was about a Sprint cell phone bill), & since I couldn't prove it to whoever had done it, I was responsible for it & I had to wind up paying it off. It happened back in September last year. Now, just recently, when I asked for a credit report for all three credit bureaus, I found out that there was another bill which wasn't mine, & it was almost $1,100 long (A cable bill)! Not only that, but it had been on my credit reports since February last year. It was happened to be run by someone who has been using my SSN of some sort to be putting the person's bill under my name, & I have no idea on where those bills kept coming from, until I asked for an investigation upon it. I immediately called the Investigator (From the company of this bill) about it, then I have written a letter & had it notarized, & went to the police station to a detective about it. Later on, the Investigator called & told me on the phone the woman's name & asked me if I knew her (which I didn't), & then told me that my relative used to live with her (which she never did!). I have managed to look up the name of the woman who had done this using her first & last name within the white pages from where I lived. Her name was on there, as well as her address & her phone number. I didn't go to visit her, because it would've been a bad thing. Then, by luck, the investigator confronted her, & she admitted that she had done it, then he told me that this bill will be taken off my credit reports within 30 days. I was lucky that time. Now I'm thinking about reporting her to the police about this. I now have all three of my credit bureaus locked, just to make sure that this doesn't ever happen again!
 
March 4, 2008, 2:16 pm CST

frauds

Many years ago, I worked as a bad debt collector for a large department store. It was not uncommon at that time to discover that more than one parent opened an account in the name of a minor child, believing we would be unable to collect. This was long before the Internet made identity theft and credit something akin to a parlor game. There are sociopaths and scam artists everywhere, and we are related to some of them.
 
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