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Topic : 04/01 The Superbug

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Created on : Friday, February 29, 2008, 01:21:15 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1
Could a grave danger be lurking in your home? If you believe the headlines, you know that catching the Superbug can have deadly consequences, but should you be concerned? How can you spot the danger, and what can you do to stay safe? Dr. Phil gets to the bottom of these questions and others. Melissa's son, Mark, was just 13 when he went to the hospital and wound up with MRSA, also known as the Superbug. Learn about Melissa’s tragic loss and why she thinks her son’s death could have been prevented. Then, 19-year-old Stephanie has been battling the Superbug for almost a year. Get a firsthand account of her experience with the disease, and find out what advice her doctor gave her that has Dr. Phil shocked and concerned. Even doctors aren’t immune to the Superbug. Dr. Drew O’Neal had an accident while on vacation, and what happened next changed his life forever. He shares his valuable insights as both doctor and patient. Plus, two years ago, Glen was your average sophomore playing on his high school football team -- until he contracted the Superbug right from the team’s locker room. Find out what important lessons he learned that could help protect you and your children from the disease. And renowned pediatrician Dr. Jim Sears weighs in with the latest information and shows off products to keep on hand that could save your life. Join the discussion.

Find out what happened on the show.

As of January, 2009, this message board will become "Read Only" and will be closed to further posting. Please join the NEW Dr. Phil Community to continue your discussions, personalize your message board experience, start a blog and meet new friends.

March 3, 2008, 8:03 am CST

Is the nursing staff checked?

QUOTE

feel some of the reasons for the spread of this dangerous disease is the un cleanliness and the traveling nurses. It was rare that I saw the same nurse twice.


Best of luck to all.


As I stated back a bit on this forum and that is the nurses are not tested (at least in the hospital I was in) for MRSA because if they have it they could no longer go near patients. I did not make this up; I was told this from one of the nurses.  Before you say no way; think about what this would do to the nursing staff if they did.


This is a tough subject “IF” it is true that 70% of the population are carrier's of MRSA… It is doing nothing when a Doctor or Hospital finds you have it that is wrong if you ask me; but no one asked me.
 
March 3, 2008, 10:58 am CST

MRSA....

Quote From: f_brosius

QUOTE

feel some of the reasons for the spread of this dangerous disease is the un cleanliness and the traveling nurses. It was rare that I saw the same nurse twice.


Best of luck to all.


As I stated back a bit on this forum and that is the nurses are not tested (at least in the hospital I was in) for MRSA because if they have it they could no longer go near patients. I did not make this up; I was told this from one of the nurses.  Before you say no way; think about what this would do to the nursing staff if they did.


This is a tough subject IF it is true that 70% of the population are carrier's of MRSA It is doing nothing when a Doctor or Hospital finds you have it that is wrong if you ask me; but no one asked me.

 

That # is WAY too high for the percentage of people in the community affected and or colonized with it.

 

Only about 25-30% of the population have Staph aureus on their skin or in their nose.  Far fewer, about 1% are colonized with MRSA. 

 

"MRSA is carried, or "colonized," by about 1% of the population, although most of them aren't infected."

 

"Roughly 5% of people treated in U.S. hospitals for MRSA died of the infection in 2005, according to a new report from the government's Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality."

 

"95% of these non-health-care-related infections are confined to the skin and soft tissue, he says."

 

http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/understanding-mrsa-methicillin-resistant-staphylococcus-aureus

 

Also:

 

"Nurses who work in general medical units who go home in their scrubs are not a risk to the public," she says. Even so, Dash insists nurses wear clean uniforms laundered in bleach; and she prefers nurses go straight home after work, change out of their uniforms, and shower...

 

A positive result means a nurse harbored MRSA at the time of the culture, but the bacteria could be transient. Other nurses might remain colonized yet pose scant risk of infecting others, she says."

 

http://include.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2003304010336

 
March 3, 2008, 2:14 pm CST

46 of 1,000 Hospital Patients Infected or Colonized With Super Bug

Quote From: gwarrior6

 

That # is WAY too high for the percentage of people in the community affected and or colonized with it.

 

Only about 25-30% of the population have Staph aureus on their skin or in their nose.  Far fewer, about 1% are colonized with MRSA. 

 

"MRSA is carried, or "colonized," by about 1% of the population, although most of them aren't infected."

 

"Roughly 5% of people treated in U.S. hospitals for MRSA died of the infection in 2005, according to a new report from the government's Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality."

 

"95% of these non-health-care-related infections are confined to the skin and soft tissue, he says."

 

http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/understanding-mrsa-methicillin-resistant-staphylococcus-aureus

 

Also:

 

"Nurses who work in general medical units who go home in their scrubs are not a risk to the public," she says. Even so, Dash insists nurses wear clean uniforms laundered in bleach; and she prefers nurses go straight home after work, change out of their uniforms, and shower...

 

A positive result means a nurse harbored MRSA at the time of the culture, but the bacteria could be transient. Other nurses might remain colonized yet pose scant risk of infecting others, she says."

 

http://include.nurse.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2003304010336

I had this stuff and was in the Hospital back in November 2007 and not 2005 and things have changed. I will post the web site to look at and also a article on just how high the percentage rate was in June 2007. I do know one thing and that is that if   46 of 1,000 Hospital Patients Infected or Colonized With Super Bug how many have it that are not in the Hospital. I do not know about you but when the Hospital nursing staff says 70% of the people have it; well it just may be somewhat true.

 

ALSO as I said: 5 MRSA 'Hot Spots' Where in your community does MRSA lurk? You can find it in gyms, barracks, prisons, and schools -- but also in your very own nose. WebMD Feature .

This is what is wrong with: "Nurses who work in general medical units who go home in their scrubs are not a risk to the public," she says. Even so, Dash insists nurses wear clean uniforms laundered in bleach; and she prefers nurses go straight home after work, change out of their uniforms, and shower...” The Nose is the problem as I stated not the scrubs; find a way to clean it and you may kick this MRSA mess.  Good luck cleaning the nose.

 

 

SEE BELOW:

 

http://www.webmd.com/search/search_results/default.aspx?query=mrsa&sourceType=undefined

What you will find listed…………………

MRSA: Experts Answer Your Questions WebMD spoke with experts to get answers to nine common questions about MRSA...Oct. 24, 2007 -- MRSA, the superbug that is resistant to many antibiotics, has been making headlines recently. This month, a... WebMD Health News

Understanding MRSA (Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus) Information on MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), a contagious bacterium that typically infects the skin but can infect other parts of the body. WebMD Medical Reference

MRSA Rates Much Higher Than Thought The prevalence of the drug-resistant staph MRSA in the nation’s hospitals is as much as 11 times greater than previous estimates suggest. WebMD Health News

5 MRSA 'Hot Spots' Where in your community does MRSA lurk? You can find it in gyms, barracks, prisons, and schools -- but also in your very own nose. WebMD Feature

More U.S. Deaths From MRSA Than AIDS It appears that more people in the U.S. now die from the mostly hospital-acquired staph infection MRSA than from HIV/AIDS, according to a new report from the CDC. WebMD Health News

MRSA Infections Can Be Flesh Eaters Drug-resistant staph infections (MRSA infections) are on the rise and may, in rare cases, cause a potentially deadly flesh-eating disease called necrotizing fasciitis. WebMD Health News

MRSA What is methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureaus (MRSA)?...Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium that causes infections in different parts of the body. It's tougher to... WebMD Medical Reference

Understanding MRSA Prevention Learn about the prevention of MRSA (Methicillin_resistant Staphylococcus aureus) from the experts at WebMD. WebMD Medical Reference

Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) - Overview What is methicillin - resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)?Methicillin - resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a type of...is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)? WebMD Medical Reference from Healthwise

Understanding MRSA Symptoms Learn about the symptoms of MRSA (Methicillin_resistant Staphylococcus aureus) from the experts at WebMD. WebMD Medical Reference

MRSA Rates Much Higher Than Thought

Survey: 46 of 1,000 Hospital Patients Infected or Colonized With Super Bug

By Salynn Boyles
WebMD Medical News

Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD

June 25, 2007 – The prevalence of the drug-resistant staph MRSA in the nation’s hospitals is as much as 11 times greater than previous estimates suggest, according to findings from the most comprehensive study of the infection ever done.

For every 1,000 patients treated in U.S. hospitals, 46 cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) now occur, researchers concluded.

The finding was based on “snapshot” surveys of infection control workers representing 21% of the health care facilities in the United States, conducted by the group Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

The study was also the first to include both active MRSA infection and patients who were carriers of the bacteria (not sickened by infection, but were able to transmit it to others).

Infection control specialist William Jarvis, MD, tells WebMD that the findings should serve as a wake-up call for those running the nation’s hospitals, nursing homes, and other in-patient health care centers.

“We know what to do,” he says. “This problem is larger than we thought, and the resources need to be made available to appropriately address it.”

MRSA ‘Super Bug’

First reported in U.S. hospitals in the late 1970s, MRSA is now by far the most common hospital-acquired staph infection in this country and throughout the world.

Known as a super bug because it is resistant to so many antibiotics, MRSA is seen most often in patients who have undergone invasive medical procedures or who have weakened immune systems.

While it is clear that MRSA is a growing problem in the nation’s hospitals and other health care facilities, little research has been done to determine the exact magnitude of the problem at a national level.

In an effort to address this, APIC polled its members working in infection control at hospitals and other health care centers in all 50 states.

Participants were asked to provide a one-day ‘snapshot’ of their facility’s MRSA burden, including patients who were either infected or colonized, meaning they had no symptoms from the MRSA  but were able to transmit MRSA to others.

The survey responses indicated that for every 1,000 patients treated in hospital or other in-patient health care settings, 34 are infected and 12 are colonized with MRSA.

Seventy-five percent of cases were identified within 48 hours of hospital admission, meaning these patients probably acquired the infection during a previous hospital stay or within the community.

Community-Acquired MRSA

Most MRSA is transmitted in hospitals and other health care facilities, but there is growing concern about community-acquired drug-resistant staph infections.

At first glance, the latest findings suggest a high prevalence of community-acquired MRSA, but Jarvis says the clinical presentation of the cases indicates that most infections were acquired during previous hospital stays.

Hospital-acquired MRSA can manifest as serious and potentially life-threatening bloodstream infections, surgical site infections, or pneumonia in patients who may have weakened immune systems.

Community-acquired MRSA generally presents as a skin infection and is commonly seen in people who are otherwise healthy.

“The extent of the problem of health-care associated infection is much larger than that of community-acquired infection, but our data suggest that the both are increasing,” Jarvis says.

Preventing MRSA

While health care facilities were generally quick to employ recommended practices to prevent the spread of MRSA once the organism had been identified, the survey indicated that delays in diagnosing patients with the drug-resistant staph infection or colonization are placing health workers and other patients at unnecessary risk.

“Some health care facilities are aggressively addressing MRSA, but the scope of this public health threat demands commitment and participation from every facility, at all levels,” says APIC President Denise Murphy, RN.

Last fall, the CDC issued recommendations for managing MRSA and other multidrug-resistant organisms in hospitals, stressing the judicious use of antibiotics, frequent hand washing by all medical personnel and support staff, and surveillance.

CDC medical epidemiologist John Jernigan, MD, says it is clear that MRSA can be controlled when proper procedures are followed.

“MRSA is a hugely important problem in U.S. health care facilities, and more needs to be done to prevent it,” he says. “Every step of the way these facilities should be closely monitoring MRSA rates, and adjusting their approach to controlling the spread of the organism if these rates aren’t coming down.

 

 
March 3, 2008, 3:42 pm CST

People can quit picking their noses....

The Main Hot Spot for MRSA

Why do so many people carry staph germs? Because the human body is the staph bacterium's natural habitat, says Gordon Dickinson, MD, chief of infectious diseases at the University of Miami and the Miami VA Medical Center.

"We are the ecology," Dickinson tells WebMD. "Humans are the ecological niche for Staphylococcus aureus. MRSA is just a variant."

This means the No. 1 hot spot for MRSA is: your nose.

"It can live in moist areas of the skin -- like under the arms, in the groin -- but you find it mainly inside the front of the nose," Dickinson says.

Whose nose? There's a very good chance it's your own.

"Our current understanding is that 20% of healthy people never seem to carry staph, while up to 60% carry it sometimes," Dickinson says. "And 20% of healthy people carry staph day in and day out, usually in their noses."

Most of these people carry the normal kind of staph. But an increasing number carry MRSA. Why doesn't it hurt them?

"We don't understand why staph causes mischief. Most of the time it does not," Dickinson says. "But presumably, little breaks in the skin allow it to get past our barriers. Then it can multiply -- and staph comes with a bundle of proteins and toxins and enzymes that allow it to do a lot of damage."

So how can you stop staph from getting from the front of your nose to your skin?

"Theoretically, one thing people can do is quit picking their noses. But that won't help -- studies show people can't keep their hands away from their noses," Dickinson says.

Fortunately, there are a number of ways to prevent infection with both normal staph and MRSA.

 

Any Questions?????

 
March 3, 2008, 5:16 pm CST

Numbers?

Quote From: f_brosius

The Main Hot Spot for MRSA

Why do so many people carry staph germs? Because the human body is the staph bacterium's natural habitat, says Gordon Dickinson, MD, chief of infectious diseases at the University of Miami and the Miami VA Medical Center.

"We are the ecology," Dickinson tells WebMD. "Humans are the ecological niche for Staphylococcus aureus. MRSA is just a variant."

This means the No. 1 hot spot for MRSA is: your nose.

"It can live in moist areas of the skin -- like under the arms, in the groin -- but you find it mainly inside the front of the nose," Dickinson says.

Whose nose? There's a very good chance it's your own.

"Our current understanding is that 20% of healthy people never seem to carry staph, while up to 60% carry it sometimes," Dickinson says. "And 20% of healthy people carry staph day in and day out, usually in their noses."

Most of these people carry the normal kind of staph. But an increasing number carry MRSA. Why doesn't it hurt them?

"We don't understand why staph causes mischief. Most of the time it does not," Dickinson says. "But presumably, little breaks in the skin allow it to get past our barriers. Then it can multiply -- and staph comes with a bundle of proteins and toxins and enzymes that allow it to do a lot of damage."

So how can you stop staph from getting from the front of your nose to your skin?

"Theoretically, one thing people can do is quit picking their noses. But that won't help -- studies show people can't keep their hands away from their noses," Dickinson says.

Fortunately, there are a number of ways to prevent infection with both normal staph and MRSA.

 

Any Questions?????

 

So far, you haven't refuted anything I've said.  SHOW me an exact percentage of people colonized with MRSA, not JUST with staph.  Those are two different things. You haven't shown that nurses are so evil in spreading it to the community either, it comes down to infection control and hygiene. Where does your 70% come from, cite an actual source, not something someone told you.  Or i'll think you're just out to scare people. 

 

The reason "not picking your nose won't help is that it's ALSO on your skin!  If you have it, treat it, but don't go around scaring the crap out of the majority of people who ARE NOT colonized with it!

 
March 3, 2008, 5:36 pm CST

03/07 The Superbug

Quote From: gwarrior6

 

I read over my 2nd paragraph, and wanted to clarify:

 

Yes, you can have MRSA and not get sick, but pass it on.

 

As for the cleaning, it will only get rid of the MRSA that's on surfaces (and not necessarily all of it).

It comes down to being hygenic.

 

MRSA seems to be more prevalent in crowded, dirty environments, among athletes and in prisons, also.

 

One reason why it's spread in hospitals is that it takes a day or two to get the results from a culture (which identifies MRSA), so that person has a couple of days of NOT being in isolation.  Also, even isolated patients occasionally have to "travel"down to different departments in the hospital,which can spread it.

 

I'd suggest that people who visit the hospital carry a little bottle of hand sanitizer, and use right before they get in the car to go home (to prevent the bacteria from getting on your steering wheel).  Even sanitizers are not enough.  When you get home, WASH your hands thoroughly.

Thank you for the information. I went to the site. I'm glad to know that only 1% are colonized with MRSA. I DO wash my hands frequently. (No OCD-I just like to keep my hands clean) I hope we don't see an increase in this thing anytime soon. It's ironic how a hospital environment can contribute to this, we tend to go there with the idea of getting some help. Kinda between a rock and a hard spot. Because there are just simply times when a hospital visit for one reason or another cannot be avoided. I have been fortunate in my life, other than visiting someone in the hospital, I have only been hospitalized to give birth.(twice)
 
March 3, 2008, 8:38 pm CST

yes....

Quote From: housewife52

Thank you for the information. I went to the site. I'm glad to know that only 1% are colonized with MRSA. I DO wash my hands frequently. (No OCD-I just like to keep my hands clean) I hope we don't see an increase in this thing anytime soon. It's ironic how a hospital environment can contribute to this, we tend to go there with the idea of getting some help. Kinda between a rock and a hard spot. Because there are just simply times when a hospital visit for one reason or another cannot be avoided. I have been fortunate in my life, other than visiting someone in the hospital, I have only been hospitalized to give birth.(twice)

 

Good to be heard.  :)

 

Hospitals are germ sewers, I'll give you that (it's full of sick people).  Nothing is a guarantee, but as long as you keep your hands clean (and you do) and seek attention for anything that looks suspicious (the sooner you're able to treat it, the better), and youre in pretty good health then you're odds of getting it aren't high.  If you have a season pass to the hospital and/or are immunocompromised,  your odds go up. 

 

 

 
March 3, 2008, 8:56 pm CST

Scaring people? MRSA should scare you.

Maybe you just like to disagree with people and I cannot prove that but what I can say is this. First of all I said 70% of the people have MRSA (Staph) and that statement came right from the hospital staff. Now what that means is this; 70% (“while up to 60% carry it sometimes," Dickinson says.) of the people carry it and I did not say they were colonized. I said they carry it. Next I also said that it is not a problem the Doctors say unless it gets into the blood stream; this is also a true statement.

Next if you look at your own stats you will find the biggest danger is death. Your own stats here "Roughly 5% of people treated in U.S. hospitals for MRSA died of the infection in 2005, according to a new report from the government's Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality." This comes from the problem of doing sugary and having to cut into someone to perform it. This in turn lets one wide open to its affects should it be around. Read some of the other postings on this thread as to how many had surgery in a hospital and got it. I posted what WEB MD stated and that was Seventy-five percent of cases were identified within 48 hours of hospital admission, meaning these patients probably acquired the infection during a previous hospital stay or within the community. Now how would you suggest this bug gets into hospital / surgery if not carried by the nursing staff or the Doctor himself? (Hospital-acquired MRSA can manifest as serious and potentially life-threatening bloodstream infections, surgical site infections, or pneumonia in patients who may have weakened immune systems.) Do not forget the theater is sterilized so; how do you explain it?

I will go with what I know firsthand after having MRSA and being in the hospital with it. I also hope you and your stats do not get it but the fact is this is one bad problem and this problem can kill. I have talked to parents that lost a daughter to this. I have talked to a woman whose husband lost his leg from this stuff and today; I talked with a man who had throat cancer and the Dr. held off the operation until he was the first one in on a Monday as the operating theater was sterilized over the weekend. The nurseries said they are not checked because.......; and you think I’m scaring folks.  

Scaring people? You are darn right! You had best head this from Web MD and what Doctor Jarvis is reporting:  Infection control specialist William Jarvis, MD, tells WebMD that the findings should serve as a wake-up call for those running the nation’s hospitals, nursing homes, and other in-patient health care centers.“We know what to do,” he says. “This problem is larger than we thought, and the resources need to be made available to appropriately address it.”

I hope you and your stats do well and do not get this stuff. I got it and have no clue from where but it was not in my blood stream and I still got sicker than a dog. You best take this serious as now they say something worse has popped up. You make your own call on this as for me; I have been there and done that and I do not want it again.

 

 
March 4, 2008, 6:45 am CST

Percentage....

Quote From: f_brosius

Maybe you just like to disagree with people and I cannot prove that but what I can say is this. First of all I said 70% of the people have MRSA (Staph) and that statement came right from the hospital staff. Now what that means is this; 70% (while up to 60% carry it sometimes," Dickinson says.) of the people carry it and I did not say they were colonized. I said they carry it. Next I also said that it is not a problem the Doctors say unless it gets into the blood stream; this is also a true statement.

Next if you look at your own stats you will find the biggest danger is death. Your own stats here "Roughly 5% of people treated in U.S. hospitals for MRSA died of the infection in 2005, according to a new report from the government's Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality." This comes from the problem of doing sugary and having to cut into someone to perform it. This in turn lets one wide open to its affects should it be around. Read some of the other postings on this thread as to how many had surgery in a hospital and got it. I posted what WEB MD stated and that was Seventy-five percent of cases were identified within 48 hours of hospital admission, meaning these patients probably acquired the infection during a previous hospital stay or within the community. Now how would you suggest this bug gets into hospital / surgery if not carried by the nursing staff or the Doctor himself? (Hospital-acquired MRSA can manifest as serious and potentially life-threatening bloodstream infections, surgical site infections, or pneumonia in patients who may have weakened immune systems.) Do not forget the theater is sterilized so; how do you explain it?

I will go with what I know firsthand after having MRSA and being in the hospital with it. I also hope you and your stats do not get it but the fact is this is one bad problem and this problem can kill. I have talked to parents that lost a daughter to this. I have talked to a woman whose husband lost his leg from this stuff and today; I talked with a man who had throat cancer and the Dr. held off the operation until he was the first one in on a Monday as the operating theater was sterilized over the weekend. The nurseries said they are not checked because.......; and you think Im scaring folks.  

Scaring people? You are darn right! You had best head this from Web MD and what Doctor Jarvis is reporting:  Infection control specialist William Jarvis, MD, tells WebMD that the findings should serve as a wake-up call for those running the nations hospitals, nursing homes, and other in-patient health care centers.We know what to do, he says. This problem is larger than we thought, and the resources need to be made available to appropriately address it.

I hope you and your stats do well and do not get this stuff. I got it and have no clue from where but it was not in my blood stream and I still got sicker than a dog. You best take this serious as now they say something worse has popped up. You make your own call on this as for me; I have been there and done that and I do not want it again.

 

 

Seventy-five percent of cases were identified within 48 hours of hospital admission.

 

75% of MRSA cases were IDENTIFIED in the first two days.  NOT 75% were colonized, THOSE ARE DIFFERENT!!!!

DO you not understand the difference between common as dirt staph aureus and MRSA?  THEY ARE DIFFERENT!

 

I never said don't take it seriously, but get your facts straight, do not misinterpret an obscure statistic.  You're lumping ALL staph infections AS MRSA.  While MRSA is staph, not all staph is MRSA. 

Your claim that 70% of people have MRSA is ridiculously high. 

 

I'm sorry you had a bad experience, and I understand that you don't want it again (who would), but please do not misinterpret the facts. 

 

 
March 4, 2008, 7:07 am CST

70%

 

If it's true that 70% of ALL people have MRSA (which is incredibly FALSE), every patient I had in NOVEMBER of 2007 would have been in isolation (we screen for it on admission).  There was about 3-5% in the hospital at any given time, and we live in a "hot spot" for it (btw, I myself am VERY hygenic before AND after I care for an isolation pt, wash my hands thoroughly and use the alchohol foam on top of it, in addition to gloves, gowns, and masks as necessary).  I take MRSA very seriously.

 

60% of people may have a transient form of plain ol' staph at a given point in their lives, but NOT MRSA.  All MRSA is staph, but not ALL staph is MRSA.  Some are more predisposed to it than others, and other than good hygiene and proper treatment, there's nothing you can really do about it, you might as well worry the sun will run out of Helium....UGH!

 
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