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Topic : 04/01 The Superbug

Number of Replies: 539
New Messages This Week: 0
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Created on : Friday, February 29, 2008, 01:21:15 pm
Author : DrPhilBoard1
Could a grave danger be lurking in your home? If you believe the headlines, you know that catching the Superbug can have deadly consequences, but should you be concerned? How can you spot the danger, and what can you do to stay safe? Dr. Phil gets to the bottom of these questions and others. Melissa's son, Mark, was just 13 when he went to the hospital and wound up with MRSA, also known as the Superbug. Learn about Melissa’s tragic loss and why she thinks her son’s death could have been prevented. Then, 19-year-old Stephanie has been battling the Superbug for almost a year. Get a firsthand account of her experience with the disease, and find out what advice her doctor gave her that has Dr. Phil shocked and concerned. Even doctors aren’t immune to the Superbug. Dr. Drew O’Neal had an accident while on vacation, and what happened next changed his life forever. He shares his valuable insights as both doctor and patient. Plus, two years ago, Glen was your average sophomore playing on his high school football team -- until he contracted the Superbug right from the team’s locker room. Find out what important lessons he learned that could help protect you and your children from the disease. And renowned pediatrician Dr. Jim Sears weighs in with the latest information and shows off products to keep on hand that could save your life. Join the discussion.

Find out what happened on the show.

As of January, 2009, this message board will become "Read Only" and will be closed to further posting. Please join the NEW Dr. Phil Community to continue your discussions, personalize your message board experience, start a blog and meet new friends.

June 8, 2008, 9:06 pm CDT

MRSA - someone who survived

Good day. I am 36 years old woman. I picked up the hospital staph infection last year in a South African private hospital, after back surgery - I had a fusion done on my spine. I made a miraculous recovery within six weeks and would like to share how I beat it. First of all, I went back to the hospital within two days after feeling ill - you have to go back soon. I had a fever and a feeling that I was not getting better and I was getting terrible headaches. The nurses tried to shoo us away (my mother was with me all the way) but I insisted on waiting to see the surgeon, who felt the puffy red wound (giveaway). He immediately ordered tests when I told him about the headaches. By that evening I was on an IV drip which fed antibiotics into my body. The surgeon's concern was like a rock for me.

The doctor re-opened the wound and cleaned it out, checking how it has spread, where it was. Thereafter I was in quarantine, the nurses in space suits, etc, just like Stephanie experienced. Unfortunately, most of the nurses had no idea what the infection was and I had to often tell them to wash their hands, not touch their own mouths/noses after touching me, etc. Family members read up on the disease for me. With the help of my mother arguing with any nurse who would not assist, we managed to get my sheets changed twice a day and I changed the hospital frock also twice a day, and clean towels twice a day. I showered with that anti-bacterial liquid hospital soap twice a day, and washed every nook and cranny from my hair to my toe-nails with it. I washed inside my nose, I washed my scrotum, under my arms, I scrubbed well, my hair looked terrible after a while but I couldn't care. I did not use deodorants. I honestly felt I was not going to live. But my mother kept me going and made sure I did everything to keep this infection from keeping hold. I had visits from church groups and people were praying as if I was on my death bed.

Then one day, about a week later, I woke up and knew I was going to beat it. I just knew I got the better of this terrible infection. I spoke to the surgeon who agreed that I could go home - the night before I had an angina attack, caused by very bad treatment from two nurses but that is a story for another day. The doctor said I could go home if I drink the pills he prescribed. Ten days in total in hospital, that was all. It was a miracle.

I was given eighty pills, which is a lot of antibiotics after the antibiotic IV drips but I kept it going. I set my alarm clock to take a pill every six hours as I was supposed to. My mother changed the dressing on my wound every time it started draining (it kept on draining for about a month thereafter), she changed sheets every day, and I continued the washing regime. I went to see a very good GP soon thereafter who continued to take care of the wound, the stitches, and who checked my progress. He eventually had to prescribe vitamins as I was becoming aneamic.

Two months after returning home from the hospital, I stood at the airport, wearing my back brace, on my way to Australia. Where I am living nowadays.

I have since heard of people I personally knew in South Africa who died from this staph infection in hospitals there. I think I know what horrible fevers they experienced, how little strength they had and if the nursing from the hospital side was what I experienced, it was a bad way to die. My story was a miracle in so many ways.

If you have the disease, fight it. You can beat it. You really can.

 
June 8, 2008, 9:49 pm CDT

MRSA Superbug Treatment

Hi - I have just seen the MRSA show in Australia and have been reading the message board about the show and all the storys of people with MRSA. I just wanted to mention that in Australia & New Zealand there has been research, testing, trials and good success with two medical honeys. The Australian Active Jellybush (Leptospermum polygalifolium) and New Zealands Manuka ( Leptospermum scoparium). They have had good success with these special medical honeys fighting Super bugs that are resistant to antibiotics. It could be worth your while to look at these articles.

www.woundsresearch.com/article/7751

 www.medihoney.com.au/PDF/MediHoneyMarchRelease.pdf - 

Just  be careful that the Medical honey is tested and proven antibacterial/antibiotic. The two above mentioned honeys are the only proven honeys with the very high levels of Anitbacterial Activity levels.

Some other google searches that may be helpful are MRSA Shona Blair & MRSA Dr Peter Molan. I hope this is helpful for somebody.

 
June 17, 2008, 8:24 am CDT

possible help with the superbug

Microcyn Technology, an anti-infective therapeutic with wound healing capability, is a small molecule oxychlorine compound that mimics the same oxychlorine composition as that manufactured by neutrophils in the bodys immune system. Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cells in humans and form an integral part of the immune system. One of Microcyns primary modes of action is its ability to treat a wide range of pathogens, including antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria (including MRSA and VRE), viruses, fungi and spores. Studies also demonstrate that Microcyn delivers wound-healing benefits including increased blood flow to the wound bed and reduction of inflammation all while remaining safe as saline and biocompatible. Microcyn Technology is novel in that it has antimicrobial and wound healing properties in a uniquely stable formulation.   

Bruce Thornton, vice president of international sales and operations for Oculus Innovative Sciences, said, Our marketing and clinical teams continuously solicit market feedback and one of the most frequent requests has been for a Microcyn gel formulation that encapsulates both the safety profile and the efficacy of the original Microcyn solution in an extended-moistening formula that also provides an ongoing barrier to infection and a medium that allows for delivery of Microcyns active ingredients over an extended period of time. The R&D team has created a large U.S. and international opportunity with this Microcyn-Gel and we look forward to moving rapidly to bring this product to commercialization, first in our existing distribution channels in India, Europe, Mexico, China, and then in the U.S. upon 510k clearance from the FDA.   

About Oculus Innovative Sciences   

Oculus Innovative Sciences is a biopharmaceutical company that develops, manufactures and markets a family of products based upon the Microcyn® Technology platform, which is intended to help prevent and treat infections in chronic and acute wounds. The Microcyn Technology platform is a biocompatible, shelf-stable solution containing active oxychlorine compounds that is currently commercialized outside the United States (Europe, India and Mexico) for the treatment of infected wounds. The solutions derived from the Microcyn Technology platform have demonstrated, in a variety of research and investigational studies, the ability to treat a wide range of pathogens, including antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria (including MRSA and VRE), viruses, fungi and spores.   

In addition to the companys existing and under-development therapeutic products, Oculus also develops, manufactures and markets a number of 510k devices and products for both professional and consumer. This includes the recently announced Oculus MDD (Microcyn Delivery Device) for dressing-free treatment of both chronic and acute wounds. As well, Dermacyn Wound Care is currently being test marketed in the U.S. for the moistening and debriding of wounds.   

A recently completed U.S. Phase II clinical trial of Microcyn Technology met the primary endpoints of safety and efficacy for the treatment of mildly infected diabetic foot ulcers.   

Oculus' principal operations are in Petaluma, California, and it conducts operations in Europe, Latin America and Japan through its wholly owned subsidiaries, Oculus Innovative Sciences Netherlands B.V., Oculus Technologies of Mexico, S.A. de C.V. and Oculus Japan K.K. Oculus' website is www.oculusis.com.  

 
 
August 18, 2008, 7:32 pm CDT

MRSA -- It is an epidemic!

Quote From: silvert1

 

I am a 50 year old 5 year breast cancer survivor who has been 'battling' MRSA since at the very least Sept, 2007.  On Aug 29,2007, I had a bilateral mastectomy (left side recurrence, right side prophylactic) followed by an immediate DIEP reconstruction, where my own belly fat was used to build new breasts.  I was on the table for 10+ hours, and while that was long and difficult, including a spell when I literally quit breathing 2 days later, the worst was yet to come.  My abdoominal incision went from 1' behind hip to 1' behind hip, long, long scar, but my belly fat was gone.  Within 10 days of that surgery, my abdominal incision began to open up and 'weep', drain, so we went back to doc.  Doc obtained culture of oozing stuff, and it came back positive for MRSA.  By that time, my incision was literally opening up and spliting like a zipper being unzipped.  Immediately back to doc, who 'snipped' the last tissue holding my abdominal wound together, right there in the office, my husband almost fainted.  The doc did this in order to allow the wound to drain and 'heal from the inside out'.  At this point, the open wound was 8' long (side to side) 1 1/2 ' deep, and 2 1/2 ' wide). After weeks of looking in the mirror at my new 'bloody smile' below my belly button, washing and rinsing and packing it daily with fresh gauze, then applying sanitary pads to cover the wounds...I was worn out.  However, the wound did gradually heal to the point that on Dec 5, 2007 I had a 'revision surgery' in order to fix and tuck some minor problems around my new breasts, build nipples, and close the remaining hole in my belly.  I was loaded up with Vancomyacin prior to that surgery, but in less than 5 days, my belly became hot, red, swollen, bloated, and the redness continued up my torso, and down my right hip and leg.  Immediately went back to doc, (this is a large metroplex hospital I'm talking about), and he admitted me.  For the next 8 days I was on IV antibiotics consisting of vancomyacin, clindamyacin, and another one IV I can't remember, plus oral bactrim.  I almost died.  When the doc 'lanced' my swollen abdomen on the 2nd day of hospitalization, approximately 2 cups of fluid and pus rushed out of my belly onto me, my bed, and totally surprised my doc.  That incision was less than 1/4 inch.  When I was finally sent home 6 days later, it was with home health and an incision that had widened and spread to approximately 4' long, and 2' wide, again having to heal from the inside out.  This time my insurance paid for home health nurses to take care of my wound daily, check my vitals, etc.  On Feb 14, 2008, I had the belly closed AGAIN, and while it has remained closed, I have a huge swelling just underneath the site, with obvious fluid buildup, but now everyone is afraid to drain my belly, for fear.  My family (extended, not immediate) treat me like a leper, who is death walking in the door.  I absolutely have to have an entire left elbow joint replacement, but until this MRSA is declared gone, I remain in pain, no surgeon will touch me, and I'm on pain meds to get me through day to day.  I'm only 50.  I can't pick up my grandkids.  This is what MRSA has done to me.

 

Debra


Hi Debra:  Found your letter from a google search.   How are you doing?

 

I too had a deip & ended up with MRSA.  I have been in the hospital every month since April 08' & am still on IV Vancomyacin.  I still tire easy =(  Wondering where you are now with this.  I started with biopsies last August (A year ago!)  I am now told the hematoma I received was probably the innitial breeding ground for this ugly staph.  My Infectious Disease Doctor at Cleveland Clinic said that a hematoma's center is perfect for breeding of ugly bacteria.  Who knows??? 

 

Here is my file info.

Breast Cancer Survivor with the BRCA2 Gene....

Finding out I had cancer was the easy part, getting MRSA twice & then Staph Aureus I have definately taken a HIT!

Nov. 07' Lumpectomy - got MRSA.  Breast reopeneded - Packing for 4 weeks.

I had the Deip Flap Procedure (Double Bi-lateral Masectomy) in April 2008 because I have BRCA2 Gene.
Debri-ing in May to wounds that were not healing well. 

Developed Staph in new breast week-long in-hospital stay in June --
July  MRSA of Abdomen, very ill, vomiting, fever, back to hospital - IV Antibiotics (Vancomyacin & Zosin) Surgery of abdomen - 27" incision.
Here it is August -- still home on IV Home Health checks blood level weekly.  I tire easily.  I have missed a great deal of work.  It is sad what I have become.  I am just 46.  MRSA is an epidemic & it is only going to get worse with the poor hygiene that goes on everywhere. Plus many restaurants do not often wash doors entering & exiting.  It is amazing the filth that is out there once you become ill & take extra caution.

 

Let me know how you are.

We will beat this!

joan 

 
August 20, 2008, 12:42 pm CDT

Stumbled upon article..BioNeutral kills MRSA is seconds!

Just stumbled upon this article...

BioNeutral Lab's Ygiene(TM) Hospital Grade Antimicrobial Disinfectant sets the new Global Standard to eradicate (100% kill) in seconds the most difficult and lethal microorganisms commonly found in health care facilities , including MRSA and C. Difficile

Copy and past this link to view the article:

http://health.einnews.com/article.php?nid=538203
 
October 9, 2008, 1:20 pm CDT

antibiotics

hi

 

I lived and worked in Switzerland for a while recently.  I came home from a vacation in Portugal - having met friends from Canada there.  they both contracted a bacterial lung infection from someone on the airplane and were treated with antibiotics at the local clinic in Portugal.  by the time I got back to Switzerland - I was feeling poorly and realized i also had caught the bug.  the doctor was reluctant to prescribe it so early.  But.............. they had an amzing machine - they took a small blood sample - pin prick of the finger.  this was quickly analyzed and it was determined that I had a bacterial infection.  I got the Rx for the antibiotics needed and stopped the lung infection from becoming really bad.  I have COPD and knew how bad I would be if this got really into my system.  I was truly amazed by their diagnostic abilities and this machine !!!

 
November 4, 2008, 1:24 pm CST

blood born MRSA

On April 2, 2007 my father entered the hospital for a single knee replacement.  Less than one month later he was dead.  My father was released from the hospital after surgery on the Friday April 6th even after complaining of severe blisters and pain.  At 4:00 pm he had to be returned to the nearest hospital with high blood pressure and trouble breathing.  They accessed him in the ER and said his blood was too low so they admitted him.  He spent one week at this hospital with his cardiologist treating him.  He ran a fever most of the time and had a burn specialsit on his leg due to the blisters but not one person thought to check him for an infection from his surgery.  He was released that following Friday, April 13.  We were told if he ran any kind of fever to take him to the emergency room.  The following Friday, April 20 he started running a fever and became lethargic.  We had him rushed to the hospital he had his knee surgery in.  The orthopediic doctor came and looked at his knee and took a culture from his knee.  He said it could be an infection and ordered him to be put on vancomycin.  The ER did not put him on the vacomycin.  He laid in the hallway for 8 hrs until they admitted him.  They did not start any antibiotic therapy until the next evening (every minute counts when dealing with MRSA) when they finally got the culture back.  They took him to surgery to clean out his knee and replace the parts.  He spriraled down hill.  His body began to swell.  He was actually drowning in his own fluids.  He was now septic.  He couldn't eat due to damage to his throat during the surgery to clean his knee.  I cannot begin to tell you the things that were done wrong in that hospital.  The lack of hygiene and the way they treated my father when he was so ill and screaming in pain.  The memories of his last days haunt me every day.  We had no clue he would not survive.  Maybe because we were in denial but they acted like he would get better.  You can imagine our shock when we returned to the hospital at 7 am on May 1 to get a call on my cellphone from the hospital looking for me to tell me my father was dead and had had complications a few hours earlier and they didn't feel it was important to call us.  I feel the hospital gave up on my father because they assumed he would die so they were cutting their loses when it came to the expensive drugs he needed.  There is this drug Zigris that they use when death seems likely to treat sepsis.  I can cause bleeding but if a patient is going to die anyway then it's worth the risk.  The medicine is extremely expensive and since the hospital knew they were not going to get paid for my fathers treatment due to him contracting the infection at their hospital I feel the attending doctor denied the request for Zigris from one of the other doctors on the case. I don't know if it would have saved him but it should have been worth a shot.  These cases in most hospitals are not reported to the CDC because most of them are only required to report if there are numerous cases at one time so getting accurate information of all deaths is hard.  They listed my fathers death as endocarditis because of the damage to his heart due to the infection growing on his heart valve.  This was a terrible death for him.  His organs began to shut down one by one and believe it or not thru all of this they were still putting his leg on that stupid bending machine.  I'm sorry that some of this is venting I guess but I think everyone everywhere needs to know that you are at risk of death from these infections every time you are admitted to a hospital.  You need to know that if you run a slight fever don't think nothing of it.  Demand they find out why you are running a fever. Demand all nurses and doctors wash their hands before they treat you.  Please, be proactive in your own treatment.  Hospitals are not being held accountable for these MRSA deaths.  If your not held accountable why would you bother cleaning up your act?

 
November 13, 2008, 3:20 pm CST

So sorry I only found your message now...

Quote From: joan1961

Hi Debra:  Found your letter from a google search.   How are you doing?

 

I too had a deip & ended up with MRSA.  I have been in the hospital every month since April 08' & am still on IV Vancomyacin.  I still tire easy =(  Wondering where you are now with this.  I started with biopsies last August (A year ago!)  I am now told the hematoma I received was probably the innitial breeding ground for this ugly staph.  My Infectious Disease Doctor at Cleveland Clinic said that a hematoma's center is perfect for breeding of ugly bacteria.  Who knows??? 

 

Here is my file info.

Breast Cancer Survivor with the BRCA2 Gene....

Finding out I had cancer was the easy part, getting MRSA twice & then Staph Aureus I have definately taken a HIT!

Nov. 07' Lumpectomy - got MRSA.  Breast reopeneded - Packing for 4 weeks.

I had the Deip Flap Procedure (Double Bi-lateral Masectomy) in April 2008 because I have BRCA2 Gene.
Debri-ing in May to wounds that were not healing well. 

Developed Staph in new breast week-long in-hospital stay in June --
July  MRSA of Abdomen, very ill, vomiting, fever, back to hospital - IV Antibiotics (Vancomyacin & Zosin) Surgery of abdomen - 27" incision.
Here it is August -- still home on IV Home Health checks blood level weekly.  I tire easily.  I have missed a great deal of work.  It is sad what I have become.  I am just 46.  MRSA is an epidemic & it is only going to get worse with the poor hygiene that goes on everywhere. Plus many restaurants do not often wash doors entering & exiting.  It is amazing the filth that is out there once you become ill & take extra caution.

 

Let me know how you are.

We will beat this!

joan 

 

Hi Joan, I am so very sorry I only found your reply now, in mid November...I hope and pray you get this message.  MRSA is devastating.  I finally, finally healed, but have been unable to find a reputable orthopedic surgeon who will perform a very necessary left elbow joint replacement (nother long story) because of my history of MRSA. 

 

For those who don't realize.  MRSA lives on the skin.  We ALL have it.  If conditions are right, and immune systems are weakened, (as in cancer, open wounds, other severe diseases), the nasty bug finds a warm, wet, haven to grow in, and wreak havoc in our bodies.  It can and does kill.  I was hospitalized more times than I can remember, home health, trying to heal flesh eating abdominal wounds from the inside out, sometimes on my own, and sometimes with help.

 

I'm still here!!  I'm not perfect, never was, never wanted to be.  But I survived MRSA.  Because of my experience I've decided to NOT have the elbow surgery, even though I'm disabled because of my arm.  I'm only 50.  But I still tire so easily, can't work, and so and so on and so on. 

 

Please watch out for the newest "super bug" that ABC News is warning about. 

 

I hope this finds you well, and please, email me, and anyone email me with questions about MRSA at dads1997@embarqmail.com.

 

I beat cancer, and I beat MRSA twice, so I'm not too afraid of posting my email address!!

 

Deb/Debra...6 year cancer survivor

 
November 29, 2008, 10:34 pm CST

why my family

i am the mother of three boys.  i am also engaged to the man of my life.  my family has been battling mrsa since last march.  it all started when my 6 month old baby had a sore on his butt.  i took him in to see the doctor.  the results came back that he has mrsa.  how does a six month old develope mrsa when no one else in the family has ever gotten it.  shortly after that i got a sore.  the doctors said it was not mrsa but did not test it even though my youngest son just had it.  well our sores went away.  shortly after, my middle son, which was not ever two at the time, caught it.  the doctors then tried more to get rid of this thing  but everything they told us didn't work.  my middle son then got it again.  just a couple weeks ago my oldest son who is 6 got the superbug.  doctors gave him medication and told us to disinfect everything very well.  (we had been doin this since we first got this)  so now my fiance has the superbug.  i really just want this thing out of our lives.  the doctors dsay there really isn't anything else more we can do but just keep doing what we've been doing.  i am just waiting to see who in my family gets the next sore.  Is there anything else we can do?  is'nt there any new deveopment in this thing?  please help my family.
 
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