Kids and Weight Follow-Up

July 28, 2003

Thousands of viewers wrote in wanting to know what happened to the children who appeared on our shows about childhood obesity. Dr. Phil catches up with some of his most memorable young guests and their parents.


Joshua and His Mom, Tina
Four-year-old Joshua weighed almost 160 pounds when his mom, Tina, first came on the show. At the time, she insisted she had nothing to do with her son's obesity.

 

 



Sandy and Her Son, Mike
When Sandy first visited Dr. Phil, she said healthy food was too expensive. With her 12-year-old son, Mike, tipping the scales at 262 pounds, she asked Dr. Phil for help.

 


 


Amanda's Story
Amanda was pregnant with her second child when she first visited Dr. Phil. Her 3-year-old son had been placed in foster care because he weighed 120 pounds and Amanda wanted him back.

 

 


A Chubby Cheerleader?
Twelve-year-old Molly is obsessed with becoming a cheerleader. Her mother, Connie, wants to be supportive but worries that at 220 pounds, her daughter's goal isn't realistic.


 



Find out how these guests are doing and hear Dr. Phil's advice.

Update: Did Molly make the squad?

 

 

See more guest follow-ups here!


 

Dr. Phil would like to thank the companies, programs and health care providers in this show for providing goods, services or other promotional consideration to our guests appearing on "Kids and Weight Follow-Up." Because DrPhil.com and the Series do not operate, supervise, or exercise any control over any of the companies, programs or health care providers listed, they make no representations or warranty whatsoever, either expressed or implied, regarding any of the goods, services, resources or referral services provided by these companies, programs or health care providers. In no event shall DrPhil.com or the producers of the show be liable to you or anyone else for the companies' goods or services. In no event shall DrPhil.com or the producers of the Series be liable to you or anyone else for any decision made or action taken in reliance on information provided by these programs or health care providers. If you believe you need immediate assistance, please call your local emergency number or the mental health crisis hotline listed in your local phone book's government pages.