Dating and Married to Distraction: Kelly and girls

Social Networking Influence on Dating

"My personal opinion on Facebook is that it is a complete relationship destroyer," Kelly says to the women. "I personally have had some really awful experiences with it. When I first started dating my boyfriend, I had all these women Facebooking me, asking why I was with him and [saying] that I wasn't pretty enough to be with him."

 

Kristi shares her thoughts about social networking. "If I go out and I meet a guy, the first thing my friends and I are going to do when we go home is look him up and see if we can find him on Facebook. And by the time I would actually go out on a date with him, I know all of his ex-girlfriends, where he grew up, and it takes the excitement out of getting to know somebody," she says.

 

"You get really judgmental, like, 'I don't like this person. Look at her! Oh, my God, that's his ex? Look what she's wearing,'" Amy adds.

 

[AD]"How about images?" Adiat asks. "Just simply, one of your best friends taking a picture with your boyfriend or your ex. That could turn into, 'Oh, my gosh. No, she didn't! She didn't tell me she was there last night.'"

Maggie says, "Just think about in high school. When I would have a crush on someone and would get the butterflies in your stomach, you go up to them in school, and you get up the nerve to talk to them. That's all gone. When you're sitting, typing something on a screen, your face isn't attached to your persona anymore. It is in terms of an image but not in terms of you as a person."

"You are your image, and you can Photoshop your image!" Amy says.  

"How many of you have been out with a boy whom you met on the Internet?" Kelly asks the group. Two girls raise their hands. "For me, if you don't have those skills, being able to say, 'Hi, I like you,' then you're not a real human being. You're a façade of yourself, and I think a lot of that has been lost through social networking," she says.

 

"As much as we say, 'Why do we do this?' There's a reason for it," Amy says.

 

"It feels empowering in a certain way," Kelly says. "You have the power to ruin someone's day with the click of a button. Power in the wrong hands can be really, really bad."

 

[AD]"For men, it's such an easy way. It takes the gentlemen out of men these days. They can go on your Facebook [page] or your MySpace and think because they pay you one compliment that they're entitled to this, that and the other. What happened to coming to my house and courting me?" Amy asks.

 

"It's just 'Enter, enter,'" Adiat says jokingly.