Shocking Trends of the New Year: Joey, Keith

"I'd never heard of mattress surfing until my son, Frank, got killed doing it," Keith says.

"It didn't seem that dangerous at all," Joey, 16, says. "At first my brother and I kept it under 10, 20 miles an hour, and then as we
progressed, we started doing 20, 30, turning, standing up on the mattress, we started doing donuts." Tragedy struck on their third day of mattress surfing. "I was doing a donut. My brother, Frank, was riding the mattress. I'm guessing the mattress slid underneath the truck because I couldn't see," Joey explains.

"Before Joe could stop, he ran over Frank," Keith says.

"When the dust cleared, and I looked outside, my little brother was lying on the ground, and I thought he had busted his nose, so I ran over there, and it was way, way, way, way, way, way worse," Joey says. "His face was really messed up. I held his hand for, like, a second, and he held back, and that was it."

"When we got to the scene of the accident," Keith recalls, "the police told me that my son, Frank, was deceased."

"I was freaking out pretty bad," Joey remembers
.

"He was, like, hyper-ventilating, hollering and screaming, ‘It's my fault. It's my fault. I've killed my brother,'" Keith remembers. 

Joey stands in the room he once shared with his little brother. "It used to be a bunk bed, but after he died, we took the top bunk off, and now I sleep in here alone. I had no idea somebody could get killed mattress surfing. It looks fun, but there is a lot of stuff that could happen that you probably wouldn't even think of," he says.

Dr. Phil turns to Joey and Keith, sitting in the audience. "I appreciate y'all being here. What do you think about these guys saying, ‘It's just fun, no problem'?"

"I would not do it," Joey says. "It looks fun, but it's not at all because a lot of stuff could go
wrong. I witnessed firsthand what could go wrong."

"And that was just your third time doing it?" Dr. Phil asks.

"Yes, the third day," he says.

Keith says, "I just want to let everybody know it's not a fun sport, as you see. It's very deadly. And people who don't know, like me, parents who don't know, kids who don't know, please don't do it. It's very dangerous. You have no control of it. It's just terrible, terrible."

"How are you doing with all of this, Joey?" Dr. Phil asks.

"I'm doing a lot better since talking to my grandparents, and counselors at school and my girlfriend. It helped me a lot, talking through it. I kind of blamed myself at first, but then they helped me, and I don't blame myself anymore," he says.

"There's a big difference between blame and responsibility," Dr. Phil tells him. "Blame had no role in this with you. I hope you get that because you certainly didn't intend for this to happen, and you certainly didn't have a gross disregard for your brother's well-being. You wouldn't do anything in the world to hurt him. Life is a lot about intent, and I hope you hear that and think about that."

Dr. Phil tells his audience, "You're going to have to make up your own mind about this, parents at home and here in the audience. I would not strap my kid on a mattress behind a pickup with no control. That's just me."