Making a House Call
Dr. Philip Goglia is one of the top nutritionists in the nation and author of Turn Up the Heat: Unlock the Fat-Burning Power of Your Metabolism. He pays a visit to Enrique, Gina and Sarah to raid their refrigerator, perform fitness tests and collect blood work.
 
 
Watch what Dr. Goglia uncovers!
Back in his studio, Dr. Phil turns to Dr. Goglia. "Let's talk about some of the things they should be eating," he says.
 
"It's so important to eat foods that are primarily single-ingredient foods," Dr. Goglia responds. Gesturing to a table laden with groceries, he continues, "One ingredient in shrimp, one ingredient in salmon, one ingredient in almonds, oatmeal, oat flakes, oat puffs. So many folks are concerned about the diet scenario and the need to reduce calories, but if you take away calories from a child, and you don't provide them with an energy source to be fueled for the rest of the day, then you stimulate these bingeings and cravings, like we've seen in Sarah."
 
"What do y'all think about what the doctor is saying here?" Dr. Phil asks the couple.
 
[AD]"Well, as he was taking stuff out [of our home], I knew a lot of it was bad, but some of the stuff that I thought was OK was bad as well," Gina admits. "So shopping in general, I'm not doing a good job."
 
Dr. Goglia discusses the results of the blood work he performed on the family and the three metabolic types. "Enrique is fat- and protein-efficient," he tells Dr. Phil.
 
"That means what? He can process fats and proteins, but carbohydrates are like a gut bomb," Dr. Phil clarifies.
 
"Gina is dual. She requires a balance of nutrients. Some fats, some proteins, some carbohydrates " a nice balance. But we are generally so scared of fats or carbohydrates, we create an imbalance," Dr. Goglia explains.

"If the body is having to adapt to a lot of substances it doesn't like, then it's going to start hoarding fat in a survival mode, true?" Dr. Phil asks Dr. Goglia.

 

His colleague agrees. "Whenever the body has to adapt to something inappropriate that it would consider trauma or life-threatening " be it food, a stressful day " your body will start to hoard fat to protect itself," Dr. Goglia explains. 

 

Dr. Goglia says that Sarah is fat- and protein-efficient. "The apple doesn't fall far from the tree," he says.

 

[AD]Dr. Phil explains the number two mistake that parents make in their child's weight gain: modeling. "You've got to model this properly. We've got to change this environment internally," he tells Gina and Enrique. "You two have to say, 'I'm going to become the picture of health. I'm going to exercise. I'm going to eat right. I'm going to tell myself no.'"

 

He points out that both parents sneak food in the house so Sarah doesn't see it. "What's she doing?" he asks rhetorically. "She's sneaking food around and hiding it."

 

 

Dr. Phil shows Gina and Enrique a computerized progression of their daughter once she loses weight and slims down to a normal size. "That is the size your daughter should be now," Dr. Phil says, pointing to a graphic. "You guys have to be willing to say, 'You know what? I'm the mother. I'm the father. I buy the food, I prepare the food, I present the food, so I am in control. I am the gatekeeper. It's like her drug of preference is food, and you're the dealers."

 

Dr. Phil revisits with his staff member Polly, who is wearing a fat suit. He asks her to sit in front of Sarah's parents.

 

Hear Polly's poignant message for Gina and Enrique.

 

Dr. Phil has a surprise for the parents. Bistro M.D., gourmet meals designed by doctors, will provide the family with a year of nutritious food delivered daily. Also, New Image Camps will give Sarah an eight-week stay at Camp Pocono Trails, a weight-loss camp for kids ages 7 to 19. The tween will have access to a climbing wall, tennis courts, basketball, dance, yoga and a workout room.

 

The parents thank Dr. Phil for his assistance.